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18 Hours Film

18 Hours Film

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18 Hours is a 2017 Kenyan fictional film written and directed by Njue Kevin and starring Nick Ndeda, Brian Ogola and Sue Wanjiru. The film follows a rookie paramedic who survives 18 hours in an ambulance for the life of a road accident casualty who is denied admission into hospital.

Zach “Nick Ndeda” works for Raven paramedics services. His job is to handle emergency cases. An emergency call comes in from a witness about an accident that along Highway 89. A pedestrian has been involved in a high speed hit and run while on his way home from work.

Assigned head of the rescue, Zach and his driver Mark “Brian Ogola”dash out of their base and in about 20 minutes, they arrive at the scene. The casualty (whom we make a deliberate action to not see his face) is bleeding from the head and not moving.

Zach and Mark get the casualty into their ambulance and soon after, they are on their way to different hospitals. Joined by Sabina (the casualty’s wife), they each take turns watching over the casualty as they ensure he has sufficient oxygen all the time.

Marred by chaos, Zach’s is determined to keep the victim alive 18 Hours after the accident.

18 Hours is a 2017 Kenyan fictional film written and directed by Njue Kevin and starring Nick Ndeda, Brian Ogola and Sue Wanjiru. The film follows a rookie paramedic who survives 18 hours in an ambulance for the life of a road accident casualty who is denied admission into hospital. Zach "Nick Ndeda" works for Raven paramedics services. His job is to handle emergency cases. An emergency call comes in from a witness about an accident that along Highway 89. A pedestrian has been involved in a high speed hit and run while on his way home from work. Assigned head of the rescue, Zach and his driver Mark "Brian Ogola"dash out of their base and in about 20 minutes, they arrive at the scene. The casualty (whom we make a deliberate action to not see his face) is bleeding from the head and not moving. Zach and Mark get the casualty into their ambulance and soon after, they are on their way to different hospitals. Joined by Sabina (the casualty’s wife), they each take turns watching over the casualty as they ensure he has sufficient oxygen all the time. Marred by chaos, Zach’s is determined to keep the victim alive 18 Hours after the accident. [taq_review] Production A Handheld documentary-style film, the directors approach was to film 18 hours in long takes. Since the film takes place in a definite scope of time, shooting in real time added to it an authentic atmosphere. This kind of filming in mind, as opposed to a lot of cutting; ensures the viewer gets fully immersed in the narrow spaces of an ambulance. Creating a claustrophobic feel to the picture. The visual style seeks to create a portrait-like narrow field of vision giving the viewer an intimate look at the character Zach whose journey we shall follow for the entirety of the film. Zach’s fears make him vulnerable, so, visual elements including low-key lighting, striking use of light and shadow, overexposure and unusual camera placement is something explored in the film. The score, an original piece by Jacktone Okore, is composed to match the emotional authenticity of the film. The accident victim unable to speak for a majority of the film, and with the film’s little dialogue; the viewer will be soothed, encouraged and like the Victim… given the will to live. Release 18 Hours is scheduled for a cinema release from 10th November throughout Kenya and East Africa. There after, the film will be available across Africa on select VOD platforms. The film will later make a tour across Europe and North America through a selected list of international film festivals. Content Courtesy Of Digital Team

Movie

Motion Picture - 3
Sound Quality - 5.4
Graphic - 8
Original Story - 9.7

6.5

Awesome

he film, inspired by numerous true events, follows a rookie paramedic who spends 18 hours in an ambulance for the life of a casualty who struggles to get admission into hospital.

User Rating: 4.7 ( 1 votes)
7

Production

A Handheld documentary-style film, the directors approach was to film 18 hours in long takes. Since the film takes place in a definite scope of time, shooting in real time added to it an authentic atmosphere. This kind of filming in mind, as opposed to a lot of cutting; ensures the viewer gets fully immersed in the narrow spaces of an ambulance. Creating a claustrophobic feel to the picture.

The visual style seeks to create a portrait-like narrow field of vision giving the viewer an intimate look at the character Zach whose journey we shall follow for the entirety of the film. Zach’s fears make him vulnerable, so, visual elements including low-key lighting, striking use of light and shadow, overexposure and unusual camera placement is something explored in the film.

The score, an original piece by Jacktone Okore, is composed to match the emotional authenticity of the film. The accident victim unable to speak for a majority of the film, and with the film’s little dialogue; the viewer will be soothed, encouraged and like the Victim… given the will to live.

Release

18 Hours is scheduled for a cinema release from 10th November throughout Kenya and East Africa. There after, the film will be available across Africa on select VOD platforms. The film will later make a tour across Europe and North America through a selected list of international film festivals.

Content Courtesy Of Digital Team

Oscar Alochi

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