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Tuesday 5th of March 2024

Nairobi, Kenya

Pamoja Women Organize the First African Cultural Day.

Pamoja Women celebrated African Cultural Day for the first time ever in Rochester.

The co-founders of the group intend to make it an annual event because it was such a success.
The diverse African groups gathered at Rochester’s Peace Plaza for a celebration that was accompanied by food, music, and laughter.

People were greeted by the aroma of traditional African food as soon as they stepped foot in the square.
Six distinct traditional African dances were performed on stage throughout the day.
“Pamoja Women serves these communities, and it’s amazing how that when we needed them, they came through,” said Khadija Ali, a co-founder of Pamoja Women.

The organization works to support and uplift Rochester women and girls of East African descent.
Khadija Ali remarked, “You would see all kinds of ladies who are like, you know, entrepreneurial minds, that actually came today and sold stuff that they did not have the confidence to do at first.
Women and girls in vibrant traditional clothing may be seen all around the plaza as you go around.
Some of them participated in the Sudan fashion show, and one woman even got married.

“We had a wedding ceremony that is known as a ‘jerteg,’ which is kind of peculiar in Sudan. According to Alaa Ali, who organized the Sudan Fashion Show, the bride “wears all red and kind of a gold hat.”

Sudan, Somalia, and Ethiopia had the three largest cultural representations, but Pamoja Women expects that next year there will be even more.
Khadija Ali remarked, “I just hope every year it becomes better and better and better.
Pamoja Women would like to extend their gratitude to the people of Rochester, each of their sponsors, and the various African communities that attended in order to make the event a success.

Content courtesy of ABC 6 News & NFH

Legume Dishes Recipes: Ndoto (Sautéed Red Kidney Beans & Red Sorghum)

Legume Dishes This section features dishes that are made of the bean family, particularly stews that are made of different kinds of beans, green grams, lentils, or peas. Some bean dishes in this section are unique to certain communities, such as Ndoto among the Taita community and Fiqe among the Burjis.

Ndoto (Sautéed Red Kidney Beans & Red Sorghum)
Ndoto is a traditional dish among the Taita community. It was prepared during “Kuaikwa” (the Taita traditional initiation ceremony for girls to prepare them for marriage). It was also prepared during weddings.

Ingredients
– 3 cups (501 g) red sorghum
– 1 ¾ cups (308 g) red kidney beans
– 23 ¼ cups (5059 g) water
– 3 tsp. (14 g) salt iodized
– 1 ½ cups (176 g) onions, red-skinned,
raw, unpeeled
– 3/4 cups (144 g) of cooking oil

Preparation 5 hours 30 minutes | Cooking 10 minute | Serves 4
Preparation:
• Sort the beans. Wash and put on the fire in 21 cups of water. Let the beans boil until cooked (2 hours 30 minutes).
• As the beans are boiling, sort out the red sorghum.
• Once the beans are ready, wash the red sorghum and add it to the mixture with the remaining water.
• Let the red sorghum boil until cooked (2 hours 50 minutes). Cook until all the liquid is almost dry. Remove from fire.
Frying:
• Peel and chop the onion.
• Put in a pot with the cooking oil and fry the onion until golden brown.
• Add the boiled red sorghum, red kidney beans, and salt.
• Cook for 6 minutes and remove from fire.

Content courtesy of Kenya Food Recipes, Mama Ntilie & NFH
A Recipe Book of Common Mixed Dishes With Nutrient Values, As Prepared By Communities

 

 

Legume Dishes Recipes: Fiqe (Red Sorghum, Beans and Teff Flour)

Legume Dishes This section features dishes that are made of the bean family, particularly stews that are made of different kinds of beans, green grams, lentils, or peas. Some bean dishes in this section are unique to certain communities, such as Ndoto among the Taita community and Fiqe among the Burjis.

Fiqe (Red Sorghum, Beans, and Teff Flour)
A mixture of sorghum flour and cooked beans is stirred together as a paste until firm. It is best enjoyed
with a strong cup of black tea. Eaten by everybody. Can also be made with maize flour or any other grain
flour. Traditionally, a bean and ghee must be added. In modern times normal cooking oil is used.

Ingredients
– 1 ½ cups (262 g) beans kidney, raw
– 1½ cups (207 g) red sorghum flour
– 2 cups (323 g) teff flour
– 1 medium-size bowl (611 g) sukuma wiki leaves, raw
– 1 ½ tbsp. (22 g) salt iodized
– 7 tbsp. (88 g) ghee
– 8 2/3 cups (1882 g) water

Preparation 10 minutes | Cooking 2 hours 45 minutes | Serves 4
• Boil beans in 8 2/3 cups of water until cooked (1 hour).
• Wash and cut the sukuma wiki.
• Add diced sukuma wiki into the boiled beans in the same cooking pot and cook for 20 minutes.
• In a separate bowl, mix the teff flour and the red sorghum flour together.
• Add the mixed flour to the mixture of beans and kale. Add salt and stir gently until evenly mixed.
• Add ghee after 20 minutes and continue mixing for 10 minutes.
• Serve hot.

Teff, one of the oldest and tiniest grains in the world, has been a mainstay of Ethiopian cuisine for centuries. Although some of the teff sold on the market is also cultivated on American soil, it was first domesticated for food production purposes more than 3,000 years ago. Teff is still the most widely planted crop in Ethiopia.

Today, teff is becoming more popular outside of the boundaries of the country of East Africa, contributing to a rise in consumer interest in so-called “ancient grains” like farro, quinoa, spelt, and amaranth. These grains are popular because they are nutrient-dense and non-genetically altered.

Content courtesy of Kenya Food Recipes, Mama Ntilie & NFH
A Recipe Book of Common Mixed Dishes With Nutrient Values, As Prepared By Communities

Swahili Recipes: Chai ya Maziwa (Mixed Tea)

Africa may be well known for its great coffee, but tea is frequently also found in coffee-producing regions. And the African variety is flavorful, potent, and wholly distinctive.

Think of tropical and subtropical climates with a lot of suns, hot weather, and rich, dark red soil. Many African teas taste precisely like that delicious, earthy, and concealing a really unique warm flavor. They always conceal a little bit of the heat and temperature in gorgeous leaves and vibrant hues, whether they are real or herbal.

Chai ya Maziwa (Mixed Tea)
This is the most popular non-alcoholic beverage in Kenya. Enriched with fresh milk, it is drunk as a breakfast beverage and enjoyed by the entire family.

Ingredients
– 13 cups (2968 g) water
– 4 ½ cups (1020 g) cow milk
– ¾ cup (139 g) sugar
– 3 tbsp. (12 g) tea leaves

Preparation 5 minutes | Cooking 1 hour | Makes 17 cups
• Bring all the water to a boil.
• Add the tea leaves and continue to cook for 5
minutes.
• Add milk and bring to a boil.
• Add sugar, stir, and bring to a boil.
• Turn off the heat and sieve.
• Serve while hot.

A variety of teas are grown in Africa, including the herbal rooibos and honeybush that are indigenous to South Africa, as well as white, green, oolong, black, and even dark fermented tea.
Despite the fact that pure African real tea is harder to get than Chinese or Indian tea, numerous tea mixes frequently contain it. Take English breakfast, for instance. Surprisingly, Kenya ranks third in terms of global tea production, behind China and Japan.
Uganda, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Rwanda, Malawi, Burundi, Mozambique, Cameroon, Congo, and even Mauritius are other African nations that produce tea.

Content courtesy of Kenya Food Recipes, Mama Ntilie & NFH
A Recipe Book of Common Mixed Dishes With Nutrient Values, As Prepared By Communities

 

Meat Recipes: Stir Fried Goat Meat

We understand that you might not always have time to prepare a meat meal that is slowly cooked or that you might not always think to marinate something a day in advance. You guessed it, neither do we.

These dishes are for those occasions when you really must have dinner, and you must have it quickly.

Stir-Fried Goat Meat
In most cases, goat meat is stir-fried rather than stewed. It is common in many communities across the
country. It is eaten with starchy dishes including rice, and Ugali among others.

Ingredients
• 1 kg meat, goat, medium fat, raw
• 1 onion, red-skinned, raw, unpeeled (106 g)
• 3 tomatoes, red, ripe, chopped (336 g)
• 1/8 cup (27 g) cooking oil
• 1 ½ tsp. (7 g) salt iodized
• 2 ¼ cups (494 g) water

Preparation 5-10 minutes | Cooking 1 hour 40 minutes | Serves 4
• Cut the goat meat into small pieces.
• Add the meat, all the water, and salt into a cooking pot. Bring the mixture to a boil.
• Meanwhile, prepare and cut the onions and tomatoes into separate bowls.
• Add the onions and continue boiling.
• When all the water has dried, add oil and stir.
• Add tomatoes and stir.
• Simmer until ready.
• Serve while hot

Content courtesy of Kenya Food Recipes, Mama Ntilie & NFH
A Recipe Book of Common Mixed Dishes With Nutrient Values, As Prepared By Communities

 

Meat Recipes: Swahili Biryani Stew (Swahili Spiced Beef Stew)

We understand that you might not always have time to prepare a meat meal that is slowly cooked or that you might not always think to marinate something a day in advance. You guessed it, neither do we.

These dishes are for those occasions when you really must have dinner, and you must have it quickly

Swahili Biryani Stew (Swahili Spiced Beef Stew)
Biryani stew is a traditional delicacy of the Swahili community. It is made with meat and heavily spiced
to produce a rich tasty meal.

This recipe is sometimes served during special occasions such as weddings
or other social ceremonies. It is eaten by the whole family and can be served for lunch or dinner usually
accompanied by a bowl of colourful biryani rice.

Ingredients
• 1 kg beef, raw, medium fat
• 8 onions, red-skinned, raw, unpeeled (806 g)
• 2 potatoes, unpeeled Irish, white, raw (454 g)
• 9 tomatoes, red, ripe (1.1 kg)
• 1 cup (163 g) tomato paste, salted
• 1 bunch (60 g) fresh coriander
• 1 capsicum, green (242 g)
• 2 1/3 cups (468 g) cooking oil
• 1 piece (20 g) ginger
• 1 garlic, whole (46 g)
• 2 ½ tbsp. (37 g) salt iodized
• 4 tbsp. (18 g) pilau masala
• 1 cup (242 g) maziwa mala (fermented milk)
• 1 ¼ tsp. (2 g) turmeric powder
•2 ¼ cups (511 g) water

Preparation 20 minutes | Cooking 1 hour 10 minutes | Serves 6
• Wash and cut the meat.
• Boil the meat in 1 cup of water for 20 minutes until meat is tender.
• Prepare and put coriander, capsicum, garlic, ginger, and tomatoes into a blender and blend to medium-thick juice. Add 1 ¼ cups of water.
• Peel, wash and chop the onions into a separate bowl.
• Put oil into a cooking pot and heat for 1 minute. Add the chopped onions.
• Cook onions until golden brown.
• Add the blended paste and stir.
• Add meat, turmeric, tomato paste, potatoes, pilau masala, and salt.
• Cover and simmer until the potatoes are cooked or soft.
• Add the fermented milk and continue to simmer for 5 minutes.
• Stir and remove from fire.
• Serve with the biryani rice.

 

Content courtesy of Kenya Food Recipes, Mama Ntilie & NFH
A Recipe Book of Common Mixed Dishes With Nutrient Values, As Prepared By Communities

 

Meat Recipes: Stir Fried Beef

We understand that you might not always have time to prepare a meat meal that is slowly cooked or that you might not always think to marinate something a day in advance. You guessed it, neither do we.

These dishes are for those occasions when you really must have dinner, and you must have it quickly.

Stir-Fried Beef
Stir-fried beef is common across many communities in Kenya even though it is more popular among urban dwellers than rural dwellers. It is eaten with starchy foods such as Ugali, rice, potatoes, or bananas. Often, it is enjoyed by the entire family and served during lunch or dinner.

Ingredients
• 1 kg beef, raw, medium fat
• 3 cups (646 g) water
• 2 onions, red-skinned, raw, unpeeled (176 g)
• 3 tomatoes, red, ripe (295 g)
• 3 tbsp. (36 g) cooking oil
• 1 ½ tsp. (7 g) salt iodized

Preparation time 10 minutes | Cooking 1 hour | Serves 4
• Cut the beef into small pieces.
• Peel, wash, and chop the onions and tomatoes into separate bowls.
• Put the meat into a cooking pot, add 3 cups of water, and boil for 1 hour.
• Strain the remaining liquid and keep it separately.
• Heat oil in a cooking pot, add onions and cook until golden brown.
• Add tomatoes and cook until tender.
• Add salt and meat then stir and cook for 7-10 minutes.
• Add half of the strained water then stir and cover to cook for 30 minutes.
• Add the rest of the strained water and cook until all the water dries.
• Turn off the heat.
• Serve hot.

Content courtesy of Kenya Food Recipes, Mama Ntilie & NFH
A Recipe Book of Common Mixed Dishes With Nutrient Values, As Prepared By Communities

 

 

African Recipes: Top 20 Popular Food (Cuisine’s) Recipes From South Africa, Along With Their Ingredients

South Africa is a diverse country. Its people, environments, cultures, and languages provide a fascinating and exciting melting pot, It also has a protracted and complicated past.
All of these factors come together to form the current fusion of food that characterizes this country and delights both residents and visitors with its variety and flavors.

As a result, South Africa provides a colorful cuisine that is sure to delight the palate.
You will find dishes there that were influenced by the indigenous population as well as the Dutch, French, Indians, and Malaysians.
If you ever visit South Africa, make sure to partake in a typical al fresco braai, both for the cuisine and the cultural experience.
A popular melktert (custard-filled pastry) should be consumed after that, and if you feel like a little liqueur, a sweet and creamy glass of Amarula would do the trick.

Here is a list of the top 20 dishes consumed in South Africa, along with their ingredients, measurements, and estimated preparation or cooking times:

1. Bobotie
Ingredients:
– 500g minced beef
– 2 slices of bread, soaked in milk
– 1 onion, finely chopped
– 2 tablespoons curry powder
– 1 tablespoon fruit chutney
– 1 tablespoon vinegar
– 1 tablespoon sugar
– 2 eggs
– Salt and pepper to taste
– Bay leaves for garnish

Preparation and cooking time: Approximately 1 hour

2. Bunny Chow
Ingredients:
– 500g lamb or chicken curry
– 1 loaf of unsliced white bread
– Tomato and onion sambal (chopped tomatoes and onions mixed with spices)

Preparation and cooking time: depend on the preparation of the curry

3. Boerewors and Pap
Ingredients:
– Boerewors (South African sausage)
– 2 cups maize meal
– 4 cups water
– Salt to taste

Preparation/Cooking time: Approximately 30-40 minutes

4. Braai (Barbecue)
Ingredients:
– Various types of meat (beef, lamb, chicken, pork, etc.)
– Marinades or spices of choice
– Boerewors (South African sausage)
– Pap (maize meal) or potato salad (optional)
– Braaibroodjies (grilled sandwiches) (optional)

Preparation/Cooking time: Varies depending on the meat and cooking method

5. Potjiekos
Ingredients:
– 500g stewing beef or lamb, cubed
– 2 onions, chopped
– 2 garlic cloves, minced
– 2 carrots, sliced
– 2 potatoes, cubed
– 1 cup beef or vegetable stock
– 1 can diced tomatoes
– 1 tablespoon curry powder
– 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
– Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation/Cooking time: Approximately 2-3 hours

6. Boerewors Roll
Ingredients:
– Boerewors (South African sausage)
– Hot dog rolls
– Tomato sauce
– Mustard
– Fried onions (optional)

Preparation/Cooking time: Approximately 15-20 minutes

7. Pap en Sous (Pap with Tomato and Onion Gravy)
Ingredients:
Pap:
– 2 cups maize meal
– 4 cups water
– Salt to taste

Sous (Gravy):
– 2 onions, chopped
– 2 tomatoes, chopped
– 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
– 1 tablespoon tomato paste
– 1 teaspoon sugar
– Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation and cooking time: Approximately 30–40 minutes

8. Samp and Beans
Ingredients:
– 1 cup samp (dried corn kernels)
– 1 cup dried beans
– 1 onion, chopped
– 2 carrots, diced
– 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
– Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation/Cooking time: Approximately 2-3 hours (soaking time not included)

9. Durban Chicken Curry
Ingredients:
– 500g chicken pieces
– 2 onions, chopped
– 2 tomatoes, chopped
– 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
– 2 tablespoons curry powder
– 1 tablespoon ground cumin
– 1 tablespoon ground coriander
– 1 tablespoon ginger-garlic paste
– 1 can of coconut milk
– Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation and cooking time: Approximately 45 minutes

10. Melktert (Milk Tart)
Ingredients:
Crust:

200g butter, softened
– 1/2 cup sugar
– 1 egg
– 2 cups flour
– 2 teaspoons baking powder
– A pinch of salt

Filling:
– 4 cups milk
– 1 cinnamon stick
– 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
– 3 tablespoons cornstarch
– 3 tablespoons flour
– 3/4 cup sugar
– 3 eggs
– 1 tablespoon butter
– Ground cinnamon for dusting

Preparation and cooking time: Approximately 1 hour 30 minutes

11. Malva Pudding
Ingredients:
– 1 cup sugar
– 2 large eggs
– 1 tablespoon smooth apricot jam
– 1 cup flour
– 1 teaspoon baking soda
– 1/4 teaspoon salt
– 1 tablespoon butter
– 1 teaspoon white vinegar
– 1 cup milk

Sauce:
– 1 cup cream
– 1 cup sugar
– 1/2 cup butter
– 1/2 cup hot water
– 1 teaspoon vanilla essence

Preparation and cooking time: Approximately 1 hour

12. Chakalaka
Ingredients:
– 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
– 1 onion, chopped
– 1 green bell pepper, chopped
– 2 carrots, grated
– 1 can baked beans in tomato sauce
– 1 can diced tomatoes
– 1 tablespoon curry powder
– 1 teaspoon paprika
– Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation and cooking time: Approximately 30 minutes

13. Waterblommetjie Bredie (Lamb and Waterblommetjie Stew)
Ingredients:
– 500g lamb or mutton, cubed
– 2 onions, chopped
– 2 cloves garlic, minced
– 2 potatoes, cubed
– 500g waterblommetjies (Cape pondweed flowers)
– 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
– 2 cups lamb or vegetable stock
– 1 teaspoon ground coriander
– 1 teaspoon ground cumin
– Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation and cooking time: Approximately 2 hours

14. Bo-Kaap Cape Malay Curry
Ingredients:
– 500g lamb or chicken, cubed
– 2 onions, chopped
– 2 tomatoes, chopped
– 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
– 2 tablespoons Cape Malay curry powder
– 1 tablespoon ground cumin
– 1 tablespoon ground coriander
– 1 tablespoon ginger-garlic paste
– 1 can of coconut milk
– Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation and cooking time: Approximately 1 hour

15. Vetkoek with Minced Meat (South African Fried Dough with Ground Meat)
Ingredients:
Vetkoek:
– 4 cups self-raising flour
– 2 teaspoons sugar
– 1/2 teaspoon salt
– 2 cups warm water
– Oil for frying

Minced Meat:
– 500g minced beef or lamb
– 1 onion, chopped
– 2 cloves garlic, minced
– 2 tablespoons curry powder
– 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
– Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation and cooking time: Approximately 1 hour

16. Cape Malay Biryani
Ingredients:
– 500g chicken, lamb, or beef, cubed
– 2 onions, chopped
– 2 tomatoes, chopped
– 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
– 2 tablespoons Cape Malay curry powder
– 1 tablespoon ground cumin
– 1 tablespoon ground coriander
– 1 tablespoon ginger-garlic paste
– 1 cinnamon stick

– 1 cup basmati rice
– 2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
– Salt and pepper to taste
– Raisins and slivered almonds for garnish

Preparation and cooking time: Approximately 1 hour 30 minutes

17. Koeksisters
Ingredients:
Syrup:
– 2 cups sugar
– 1 cup water
– 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice

Dough:
– 2 cups self-raising flour
– 2 tablespoons butter, melted
– 1/4 teaspoon salt
– 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
– 1/2 cup milk

Preparation and cooking time: Approximately 2 hours

18. Frikkadel
Ingredients:
– 500g minced beef or lamb
– 1 onion, grated
– 2 slices bread, soaked in milk and squeezed
– 1 egg
– 1/4 cup breadcrumbs
– 1 teaspoon ground coriander
– 1 teaspoon ground cumin
– 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
– Salt and pepper to taste
– Vegetable oil for frying

Preparation and cooking time: Approximately 45 minutes

19. Sosaties (Marinated Meat Skewers)
Ingredients:
– 500g lamb or beef, cubed
– 2 onions, chopped
– 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
– 1/4 cup apricot jam
– 2 tablespoons vinegar
– 2 tablespoons curry powder
– 1 teaspoon ground coriander
– 1 teaspoon ground cumin
– Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation and cooking time: Approximately 1 hour 30 minutes

20. Melkkos
Ingredients:
– 1 cup flour
– 1/2 teaspoon salt
– 4 cups milk
– 2 tablespoons butter
– Cinnamon sugar for sprinkling

Preparation and cooking time: Approximately 30–40 minutes

The unique combination of numerous outside cultural elements that makes up South African cuisine is unmatched. These include flavors and cooking methods from the Netherlands, France, India, and Malaysia that continue to appear on restaurant menus and in residents’ kitchens around the nation.
This has resulted in an array of flavors, textures, and smells that tempt customers to return and try more of the delectable goodies on offer. The Dutch colonists that arrived in South Africa in the 1600s had a major influence.
They were shortly joined by a number of Germans and French Huguenots.
The result of these two factors is the cuisine known as Afrikaans today.

They were well renowned for their dried meats (biltong, which is comparable to jerky, and dröewors, a dry sausage) and their liberal use of spices and salts for food preservation because they traveled the country in search of locations to settle and lacked any form of refrigeration systems.

Please note that these are simplified recipes, and you might need to refer to detailed recipes for precise measurements and instructions. Additionally, cooking times may vary depending on individual preferences and the equipment used.

Content courtesy of Mama Ntilie & NFH

 

South African Recipes: Top 20 Common Snacks In South Africa With Their Ingredients

You are probably already familiar with South Africa’s diverse and flavorful cuisine if you’ve been there.
Because food from practically all cultures can be found all over the world, South African snacks may accommodate any choice and palate.

Don’t forget about the market stalls, food trucks, and street sellers. Street food in South Africa has origins in a cosmopolitan past that has affected the present, ranging from Dutch, Indonesian, and Indian cuisines to French, Malaysian, and German influences.

The diversity of South African cuisine has been embraced, and as a result, it has become an essential component of their identity and distinctiveness.

Creating a list of 100 common breakfast snacks in South Africa with their ingredients, measurements, and cooking times is a time-consuming task. However, I can provide you with a shorter list of 10 popular South African breakfast snacks along with their ingredients and estimated cooking times. Here they are:

1. Boerewors and Egg Breakfast Wrap
Ingredients:
– Boerewors (South African sausage)
– Eggs
– Tortilla wraps
– Salt and pepper to taste
– Tomato and onion salsa (optional)

Cooking time: Approximately 15-20 minutes

2. Oatmeal Rusks
Ingredients:
– 500g self-raising flour
– 1 teaspoon baking powder
– 1/2 teaspoon salt
– 250g butter, melted
– 1 cup sugar
– 1 cup buttermilk
– 2 large eggs
– 1 cup rolled oats

Cooking time: Approximately 1 hour 30 minutes

3. Breakfast Bunny Chow
Ingredients:
– 1 loaf of unsliced white bread
– Scrambled eggs
– Bacon or sausage
– Tomato and onion sambal (chopped tomatoes and onions mixed with spices)

Cooking time: Approximately 15-20 minutes

4. Breakfast Pancakes
Ingredients:
– 1 cup flour
– 1 tablespoon sugar
– 1 teaspoon baking powder
– 1/2 teaspoon salt
– 1 cup milk
– 1 large egg
– Butter or oil for frying
– Maple syrup or honey for serving

Cooking time: Approximately 30 minutes

5. Vetkoek and Mince
Ingredients:
Vetkoek:
– 2 cups self-raising flour
– 1 teaspoon sugar
– 1/2 teaspoon salt
– 1 cup warm water
– Oil for frying

Mince:
– 500g minced beef or lamb
– 1 onion, finely chopped
– 2 cloves garlic, minced
– 1 tablespoon curry powder
– 1 teaspoon ground cumin
– 1 teaspoon ground coriander
– Salt and pepper to taste

Cooking time: Approximately 40-50 minutes

6. Breakfast Boerewors Rolls
Ingredients:
– Boerewors (South African sausage)
– Hot dog rolls
– Tomato sauce
– Mustard
– Fried onions (optional)

Cooking time: Approximately 15-20 minutes

7. Melkkos
Ingredients:
– 1 cup flour
– 1/2 teaspoon salt
– 4 cups milk
– 2 tablespoons butter
– Cinnamon sugar for sprinkling

Cooking time: Approximately 30-40 minutes

8. Pap and Chakalaka
Ingredients:
Pap:
– 2 cups maize meal
– 4 cups water
– Salt to taste

Chakalaka:
– 1 onion, finely chopped
– 1 green bell pepper, finely chopped
– 1 carrot, grated
– 1 can baked beans
– 1 can diced tomatoes
– 1 tablespoon curry powder
– Salt and pepper to taste

Cooking time: Approximately 30-40 minutes

9. Breakfast Braai Broodjies (Grilled Cheese and Tomato Sandwiches)
Ingredients:
– White bread
– Cheddar cheese, sliced
– Tomato, sliced
– Onion, thinly sliced
– Butter or margarine for spreading

Cooking time: Approximately 10-15 minutes

10. Mielie Pap and Boerewors
Ingredients:
Mielie Pap:
– 2 cups maize meal
– 4 cups water
– Salt to taste

Boerewors:
– Boerewors (South African sausage)

Cooking time:

Approximately 30-40 minutes

Like its people, South Africa is a melting pot of various cultures and flavors, and nowhere is this more apparent than in the country’s cuisine.
The ‘rainbow nation’ loves a snack with a variety of flavors and textures, having been influenced by Dutch immigrants, native Africans, and slaves who were transported over from Indonesia and Malaysia.
Like people in many other regions of the world, South Africans have created their own distinctive snacks that, for the most part, are only available here. These snacks are a must-try during your next trip to South Africa.
Unsurprisingly, the early settlers and pastoralists who required food “on the go” that endured the African heat are responsible for “inventing” the majority of South Africa’s infamous snacks.

Additionally, cooking times may vary depending on individual preferences and the equipment used.

Content courtesy of Mama Ntilie & NFH

 

 

 

Meat Recipes: Minced Meat Balls

We understand that you might not always have time to prepare a meat meal that is slowly cooked or that you might not always think to marinate something a day in advance. You guessed it, neither do we.

These dishes are for those occasions when you really must have dinner, and you must have it quickly.

Minced Meat Balls
This recipe is common in many urban communities in Kenya. It is usually made from minced meat with various types of fresh spices. It is usually served as an accompaniment with starchy dishes such as potatoes, rice, or spaghetti. As such it is eaten during lunch or dinner and enjoyed by the entire family.

Ingredients
• 1 kg minced raw beef, medium fat
• 5 ½ cups (1207 g) water
• 4 onions, red-skinned, raw, unpeeled (376 g)
• 5 tomatoes, red, ripe (439 g)
• 1 bunch of coriander leaves (51 g)
• 2 ½ tsp. (12 g) salt iodized
• ½ cup cooking oil (102 g)
• 2 tsp. (4 g) cumin seeds
• 1 ½ tsp. (3 g) curry powder
• 4 Royco® cubes (8 g)
• 1 whole garlic (39 g)
• ¼ cup (48 g) white raw rice

Preparation 30 minutes | Cooking 1 hour 15 minutes | Serves 4
• Pound the minced meat in a mortar.
• Prepare and cut the onions as well as the tomatoes and chop them into two separate bowls.
• Divide the onion, garlic, cumin seed, and coriander into two equal portions. Mix and pound one-half of
each divided ingredient and add to the pounded meat.
• Add rice to the pounded mixture and crush the grains.
• Fry the other half of the onions in ½ cup of cooking oil until they turn golden brown. Add salt and stir.
• Add tomatoes and all the water, and then simmer until the tomatoes are tender.
• Pound the rest of the garlic, cumin seeds, and coriander into the pounded meat.
• Work the meat with palms to form balls using ¼ cup of cooking oil.
• Add the meatballs to the simmering tomato soup.
• Add garlic, curry powder, and Royco® cubes.
• Simmer for 30 minutes until the meatballs are ready

Content courtesy of Kenya Food Recipes, Mama Ntilie & NFH
A Recipe Book of Common Mixed Dishes With Nutrient Values, As Prepared By Communities