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Friday 14th of June 2024

Nairobi, Kenya

We Love RnB Concert Media Launch: A Nostalgic Promise to Rock Nairobi

As the countdown begins to one of the most eagerly awaited concerts of the year, We Love RnB, anticipation fills the air. American RnB icons Bobby Valentino and Horace Brown are poised to captivate audiences as the headliners of this soirée.

The recent media launch, attended by luminaries such as Sanaipei Tande, Nameless, and Okelo Max, offered a tantalizing glimpse into what concertgoers can expect at the upcoming event.

In an exclusive interview with The Sauce, Sanaipei Tande expressed her commitment to delivering an unforgettable performance: “Whatever job I get, whatever platform I’m on, I see to it that I give my best. I can assure my fans of my best performance yet.”

Reflecting on the current state of RnB, Tande lamented its evolution: “RnB today does not hit the way it used to in its heyday. There’s not one RnB artist of the current generation that I would say I necessarily gravitate towards. Anytime I want to listen to RnB, I find myself walking down memory lane to nostalgic records from the 90s primarily.”

She further emphasized her intention to infuse elements of musicians from RnB’s golden era into her performance. On a global scale, she advocated for the resurgence of classic RnB singers, applauding We Love RnB for taking strides in this direction.

The We Love RnB concert, scheduled for May 25th at The Nairobi Showground – The Dome, promises to be a night of soulful melodies and timeless tunes, transporting audiences back to the golden age of RnB.

Content courtesy of The Sauce & NFH Digital Team

Kanye West’s Zero-Budget Super Bowl Ad: A Masterstroke in Marketing

In an era where Super Bowl commercials are synonymous with lavish productions and multimillion-dollar budgets, Kanye West has once again defied convention, this time in the advertising arena.
His latest venture?
A Super Bowl ad for his Yeezy brand was shot entirely on an iPhone with a production budget of zero dollars. Yes, you read that right: $0. And yet, the ad was nothing short of a monumental success.

Despite the jaw-dropping cost of a 30-second ad slot during the Super Bowl, reportedly $7 million this year, West’s minimalist approach has paid off in spades. The aftermath of the ad’s airing was a staggering surge in Yeezy brand orders, with 284,357 orders placed in less than 24 hours, translating to $19.3 million in sales. This feat is not just a testament to the power of the Yeezy brand but also to West’s unorthodox strategies and his understanding of modern media consumption.

Breaking the Mold

Kanye West has long been known for his unconventional methods, whether in music, fashion, or now, advertising. By opting to shoot a Super Bowl commercial on an iPhone, West has underscored a powerful message: creativity and authenticity can triumph over big-budget productions. This approach not only challenges the norms of advertising but also resonates with a digital-native audience that values genuineness over glamour.

The success of the ad campaign is a case study of efficiency and innovation. In an age where content can be created and disseminated rapidly across various platforms, West’s strategy highlights the potential of leveraging technology and social media to achieve widespread reach and impact, without the need for extravagant spending.

The Genius Behind the Madness

Critics and fans alike often describe Kanye West as a blend of madness and genius. His actions and statements have frequently sparked controversy and debate. However, it’s moments like these that showcase his ability to channel his creativity into groundbreaking successes. The Super Bowl ad is not just a win for the Yeezy brand but a personal victory for West, reinforcing his status as a visionary capable of rewriting the rules.

West’s approach to the ad also speaks volumes about his marketing acumen. Understanding that the Super Bowl audience is vast and diverse, he crafted a message that was simple yet impactful, relying on the inherent virality of his persona and the widespread recognition of his brand. This minimalist ad, devoid of any production frills, managed to captivate millions and translate that attention into tangible sales.

What This Means for the Industry

Kanye West’s Super Bowl ad venture may very well serve as a wake-up call for brands and marketers. In a landscape increasingly dominated by digital media, the principles of advertising are evolving. West has demonstrated that with the right message and brand power, massive returns can be achieved without the traditionally associated massive spending.

This incident will likely encourage more brands to explore innovative, cost-effective strategies for advertising, especially in high-stakes environments like the Super Bowl. It also reinforces the importance of brand identity and the power of leveraging personal brands to amplify product brands.

In Conclusion

Kanye West’s zero-budget Super Bowl ad is a watershed moment in advertising, challenging preconceived notions about what it takes to make a splash on one of the world’s biggest stages. It’s a reminder that in the digital age, creativity, authenticity, and innovation are as valuable, if not more so, than hefty production budgets. West’s ability to marry his artistic vision with sharp business acumen has once again paid off, solidifying his legacy as a figure who continually redefines the boundaries of what’s possible.

With a $0 production budget and an iPhone, Kanye West’s crew said that their Super Bowl commercial was a great hit.
The basic or cost-free production approach paid off handsomely, even though the 30-second ad space cost $7 million.
With 284,357 orders for the Yeezy brand placed in less than 24 hours after the spot, the ad campaign caused a spike in sales of $19.3 million.
Kanye disregards all regulations and repeats them: This guy, man, is half clever, half nuts.

#Marketing #KanyeWest #SuperBowl #AD #LifeTeachingsByOscarAlochi 

Tyla Laura Seethal Stuns in a Custom Versace at the 66th Annual Grammy Awards 2024

On Sunday, South African singer Tyla won the Best African Music Performance award at the 66th Grammy Awards.
Not only did the once-local star become a worldwide celebrity that evening, but she also topped the best-dressed list.
The 22-year-old “Water” singer looked stunning in a Versace one-shoulder gown with a soft green tone.

The flowing, floor-length gown brought to mind J-Lo’s well-known green Grammy Awards outfit from 2000.
With its lengthy train and bold geometric cutouts, the dress shone with Swarovski crystals, causing her to sparkle from head to toe.

The crystal-covered mesh sections of the dress covered parts of her arm, one leg, and a part of her torso, giving the look a sexy, yet glamorous feel.
She completed the look with a simple pair of white crystal Rene Caovilla strappy heels that wrapped around her ankles.

For jewelry, Tyla wore a pair of Maria Tash swirl-shaped earrings, as well as a belly ring by the same designer.
Her hair and make-up were on point as well.
She wore her curls in an updo, and for her makeup, she opted for a smokey eye with winged liner, which she paired with a glossy neutral lip.

Even though cut-outs and figure-hugging dresses aren’t a departure from what we’re used to seeing Tyla wearing, she certainly upped her game for the special occasion.

Tyla was nominated for the Best African Music Performance award alongside Burna Boy, Ayra Starr, Asake, Olamide, and Davido, featuring South African artist Musa Keys.

About Tyla
Tyla Laura Seethal, professionally known as Tyla, has carved a distinct niche for herself in the global music scene as a trailblazing South African singer and songwriter. Her unique blend of cultural influences, stemming from her Indian, Zulu, Mauritian, and Irish heritage, has imbued her music with a rich diversity that resonates with audiences worldwide. Born on January 30, 2002, in Johannesburg, South Africa, Tyla’s journey from a mining engineering student to a Grammy-winning artist is a testament to her unwavering dedication and passion for music.

Growing up as the middle child in a family of five, Tyla’s upbringing in Johannesburg’s vibrant cultural milieu played a crucial role in shaping her musical tastes and ambitions. Despite initially embarking on a path to become a mining engineer, Tyla’s true calling in music was undeniable. Her realization of this passion led her to pivot towards a career in music, a decision that would soon pay dividends.

Tyla’s musical breakthrough came amidst the global COVID-19 pandemic when she leveraged the power of social media to reach a wider audience. Her engaging dance routines and captivating song covers on TikTok quickly garnered a significant following, setting the stage for her breakthrough single, “Getting Late,” featuring Kooldrink, released in late 2019. The song’s success, particularly the viral reception of its music video, catapulted Tyla into the spotlight, affirming her potential as a rising star in the music industry.

In 2021, Tyla’s burgeoning career took a major leap forward when she signed with Epic Records, following the domestic success of “Getting Late.”. This partnership marked a new chapter in her career, providing her with the platform to reach audiences beyond the borders of South Africa.

Tyla’s international fame was solidified with the release of her 2023 single “Water”, a mesmerizing track that showcased her ability to blend traditional African rhythms with contemporary sounds. The single achieved remarkable success, entering the top ten in sixteen countries, including the United Kingdom and the United States. Notably, “Water” became the first song by a South African solo artist to enter the US Billboard Hot 100 in over five decades, a historic achievement that underscored Tyla’s impact on the global music scene.

The crowning moment of Tyla’s career came at the 66th Annual Grammy Awards in 2024, where she won the prestigious Grammy Award for Best African Music Performance for “Water”. This accolade not only celebrated her musical talent but also marked the recognition of African music on the global stage, aligning with Tyla’s passion for promoting her country’s culture and music.

In addition to her Grammy win, Tyla has been recognized with nominations for a BRIT Award, a Soul Train Music Award, a MOBO Award, and two South African Music Awards, highlighting her versatility and appeal across various music genres. With her self-titled debut album set for release on March 22, 2024, Tyla is poised to continue her ascent in the music industry, promising to bring more of her innovative and culturally rich music to the world stage.

Content courtesy of IOL & NFH Digital Team

Champagne Day Celebrations Across Africa Were Dazzling, Combining A Shared Passion For Sustainability With The Savoir-faire Of Moët & Chandon.

In stunning Champagne Day celebrations across Africa, a mutual love of sustainability and the savoir-faire of Moët & Chandon mingled.
Moët & Chandon, the world’s best champagne for celebration, was served as glasses were raised across Africa on October 27 to commemorate Champagne Day.
Because of its mastery, savoir-faire, and reverence for terroir, the Maison has been associated with great winemaking for almost three centuries. Regarding sustainability as the cornerstone of its future vision, Moët & Chandon is also acknowledged as an innovator in the vineyards and cellar.

As Friends of the House gathered in each nation to celebrate the enduring qualities of Maison’s iconic wines and the timeless nature of marking special and historic moments with champagne, these distinctive qualities were highlighted as part of this year’s Champagne Day festivities.
As we are in 2023, toasts were made at 20:23, appropriately honoring Moët & Chandon’s milestone 280th anniversary since its founding in Epernay, France, in 1743. Guests were invited to arrive at celebrations across Africa at 17:43.

Friends of the Maison gathered at opulent locations across Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, Cameroon, Ivory Coast, and South Africa, celebrating Champagne Day and honoring the legacy and sophistication of Moët & Chandon, united by a shared appreciation for the joy of champagne.
Chandon has become essential to savoring all of life’s most exquisite moments.
The events were hosted by Nigerian humanitarian and actress Osas Ighodaro, Kenyan media figurehead Nambitha Ben-Mazwi, the celebrated South African actress Anita Nderu, Fredy Manyongo, a businessman and model from Cameroon, Delali Damessi from Lydia Laryea from Ghana, George Williams from Tanzania, and Ivory Coast.

The hosts got to retell the best parts of their trip to Epernay earlier in the year when they had the unique opportunity to see the annual harvest and cellar operations up close, to guests at their individual celebrations.
Examining the Maison’s innovative agroecology program was a major component of their schedule.
Moët & Chandon’s Natura Nostra initiative aims to protect Champagne’s distinct natural legacy.
With the goal of increasing biodiversity in Champagne, this program aims to quicken the ecological transition.

The venues for each regional celebration, which ranged from the Hyatt Regency in Dar es Salaam to the Tribe Hotel in Nairobi and The Westcliff in Johannesburg, perfectly captured Maison’s philosophy of nature in balance with elegance.
Regardless of their nationality, the attendees shared a common fondness for champagne, valued Maison’s connection to the terroir, and recognized the significance of conserving the environment for posterity, all in true African style.

According to Aimee Kellen, Head of Consumer Engagement for Moët Hennessy Africa and the Middle East, “Champagne Day is an opportunity not only to celebrate how we have shaped the industry but also to communicate our Natura Nostra program and sustainability efforts to ensure that the joy of Moët & Chandon continues to be shared with Africa and the world.” The Maison has a rich history of winemaking excellence.
“In this most memorable of celebrations, links between our past and present were honored, with Moët & Chandon remaining as timeless and contemporary as ever today.”

About Moët & Chandon
Claude Moët founded Moët & Chandon in 1743, and his descendant Jean-Remy Moët brought the company to a global level of recognition with his vision of “sharing the effervescence of Champagne with the world.”
From red carpets to royal courts, Studio 54 to Grand Slams, Moët & Chandon has been uniting people around incredible, exhilarating moments.
The House has the most expansive and varied collection of champagnes for any taste and occasion, sourced from the most diverse and large-scale vineyards in the area.

Every creation in white and rosé is easy to adore, ranging from the classic Moët Impérial to the sophisticated Grand Vintage Collection, the cool Moët Ice Impérial to the soft Nectar Impérial, and the multifaceted Collection Impériale, the most recent manifestation of the House’s Haute Oenologie, which dazzles and delights with a wide range of flavors and aromas to capture the astounding breadth of its terroir.

Since 2009, Moët & Chandon has partnered with the House to support charitable causes through Toast for a Cause and works to protect biodiversity in the area through Natura Nostra, their long-term sustainability program.
For almost 300 years, Moët & Chandon has been the preferred champagne to commemorate historical moments as well as individual joys, adding a lively touch to every toast.

Content courtesy of  Moët & Chandon & NFH

Trace Awards & Festival 2023 Winners Full List

The winners of the 2023 Trace Awards have finally been announced at the prestigious awards ceremony, which took place in Kigali, Rwanda, on October 21st.

The top winners of the 2023 Trace Awards were Rema and Davido, who were announced on Saturday, October 21, in Kigali, Rwanda. Global TV and multimedia platform Trace has launched a new award series called the Trace Awards.
Recognizing musicians with African and Afro-influenced influences is the aim of the awards.
With his worldwide hit song “Calm Down,” Rema received song of the year. On the Billboard Hot 100, a remix of the song featuring Selena Gomez peaked at number three. Additionally, the Nigerian celebrity received the best worldwide African artist award (tying with Nomcebo).
Two more awards were given to Davido: Best Male and Best Cooperation. With his collaboration with South African artist Musa Keys, “Unavailable,” he took home the latter honor.

Album of the Year went to Nigerian Burna Boy for Love Damini. About fifty international musicians with African and Afro-inspired influences, such as Davido, Yemi Alade, Mr. Eazi, and Diamond Platnumz, performed at the Trace Awards.

Tonight has been a magnificent exhibition of the force and originality of African and African-origin musicians, according to a statement from Trace chairman and co-founder Olivier Laouchez.
African current music has become a global phenomenon, and this was highlighted by all of the candidates and performers at the Trace Awards.

In the last year, African music has gained recognition at a number of additional award events. At the American Music Awards in November 2022, Wizkid became the first-ever favorite Afrobeats artist.
The first-ever winner of Best Afrobeats at the MTV Video Awards in September was “Calm Down,” featuring Rema and Selena Gomez. On November 10, the first-ever Grammy Award nominees for greatest African music performance will be unveiled.

Three categories were declared without nominees, and prizes were given in addition to the competitive categories listed below.
These included the aforementioned Best Global African Artist award going to Rema and Nomcebo, a Change Maker award going to Mr. Eazi (also from Nigeria) for his charitable endeavors, and a lifetime achievement award going to 2Face of Nigeria.

Here is the full list of winners for the 2023 Trace Awards.

Best Male
Burna Boy (Nigeria)
Davido (Nigeria) – WINNER
Diamond Platnumz (Tanzania)
Didi B (Ivory Coast)
K.O (South Africa)
Rema (Nigeria)

Best Female
Ayra Starr (Nigeria)
Josey (Ivory Coast)
Nadia Mukami (Kenya)
Soraia Ramos (Cape Verde)
Tiwa Savage (Nigeria)
Viviane Chidid (Senegal) – WINNER

Song of the Year
“BKBN” – Soraia Ramos (Cape Verde)
“People” – Libianca (Cameroon)
“Suavemente” – Soolking (France)
“Encre” Emma’a (Gabon)
“Sugarcane” – Camidoh (Ghana)
“Last Last” – Burna Boy (Nigeria)
“Rush” Ayra Starr (Nigeria)
 “Calm Down” – Rema (Nigeria) FT Serena Gomez – WINNER
“Peru” – Fireboy DML (Nigeria) with Ed Sheeran (UK)
“Sete” – K.O (South Africa)
“Cough” – Kizz Daniel (Nigeria)
“MORTEL 06” – Innoss’B (Ivory Coast)

Best Music Video
“2 Sugar” Wizkid (Nigeria) feat. Ayra Starr (Nigeria)
“Baddie” Yemi Alade (Nigeria) – WINNER
“Kpaflotage” – Suspect 95 (Ivory Coast)
“Loaded” – Tiwa Savage (Nigeria) & Asake (Nigeria)
“Ronda” Blxckie (South Africa)
“Tombolo” – Kalash (Martinique)
“Yatapita” – Diamond Platnumz (Tanzania)

Best Newcomer sponsored by Belaire
Azawi (Uganda)
Krys M (Cameroon)
Libianca (Cameroon)
Nissi (Nigeria)
Odumodublvck (Nigeria)
Pabi Cooper (South Africa)
Roseline Layo (Ivory Coast) – WINNER

Best Collaboration
“Many Ways” – BNXN (Nigeria) with Wizkid (Nigeria)
“Mine” – Show Dem Camp (Nigeria) with Oxlade (Nigeria)
“Peru” – Fireboy DML (Nigeria) with Ed Sheeran (UK)
“Second Sermon” – Black Sherif (Ghana) with Burna Boy (Nigeria)
“Sete” – K.O (South Africa) with Young Stunna (South Africa), Blxckie (South Africa)
“Stamina” – Tiwa Savage with Ayra Starr (Nigeria) & Young Jonn (Nigeria)
“Trumpet” – Olamide (Nigeria) with Ckay (Nigeria)
“Unavailable” – Davido (Nigeria) with Musa Keys (South Africa)

Best Artist: UK
Headie One (UK)
Ms Banks (UK)
Stormzy (UK)
Raye (UK)

Best Artist: Caribbean
Admiral T (Guadeloupe)
Bamby (French Guiana)
Kalash (Martinique)
Maureen (Martinique)
Popcaan (Jamaica)
Princess Lover (Martinique)
Rutshelle Guillaume (Haiti) – WINNER
Shenseea (Jamaica)

Best Artist: Indian Ocean
Donovan BTS (Mauritius)
GaEi (Madagascar)
Goulam (Comoros) – WIINNER
Mikl (Reunion)
Sega el (Reunion)
Terell Elymoor (Mayotte)

Best Artist: Brazil
Djonga (Brazil)
Iza (Brazil)
Leo Santana (Brazil)
Ludmilla (Brazil) – WINNER
Luedji Luna (Brazil)

Best Artist: North Africa
Amira Zouhair (Morocco)
Artmasta (Tunisia)
Dystinct (Morocco) – WINNER
El Grande Toto (Morocco)
Kader Japonais (Algeria)
Raja Meziane (Algeria)
“DNK”- Aya Nakamura (France)

Best Artist: East Africa
Bruce Melodie (Rwanda)
Diamond Platnumz (Tanzania) – WINNER
Zuchu (Tanzania)
Khaligraph (Kenya)
Nadia Mukani (Kenya)
Azawi (Uganda)

Album of the Year
“Love Damini” – Burna Boy (Nigeria) – WINNER
“Maverick” – Kizz Daniel (Nigeria)
“More Love, Less Ego” – Wizkid (Nigeria)
“Timeless” – Davido (Nigeria)
“Work of Art” – Asake (Nigeria)

Best Collaboration
“Mine” – Show Dem Camp (Nigeria) with Oxlade (Nigeria)
“Peru” – Fireboy DML (Nigeria) with Ed Sheeran (UK)
“Second Sermon” – Black Sherif (Ghana) with Burna Boy (Nigeria)
“Sete” – K.O (South Africa) with Young Stunna (South Africa), Blxckie (South Africa)
“Stamina” – Tiwa Savage with Ayra Star(Nigeria) & Young Jonn (Nigeria)
“Trumpet” – Olamide (Nigeria) with Ckay (Nigeria)
“Unavailable” – Davido (Nigeria) with Musa Keys (South Africa) – WINNER

Best DJ
Danni Gato (Cape Verde)
DJ BDK (Ivory Coast)
DJ Illans (France)
DJ Spinall (Nigeria)
Michael Brun (Haiti) – WINNER
Uncle Waffles (Swaziland)

Best Producer
DJ Maphorisa (South Africa)
Juls (Ghana)
Kabza de Small (South Africa)
Kel-P (Nigeria)
Tam Sir (Ivory Coast) – WINNER
Benjamin Dube (South Africa)

Best Gospel Artist
Benjamin Dube (South Africa)
Janet Otieno (Kenya)
KS Bloom (Ivory Coast) – WINNER
Levixone (Uganda)
Moses Bliss (Nigeria)

Best Live
Burna Boy (Nigeria)
Fally Ipupa (DRC) – WINNER
Musa Keys (South Africa)
The Compozers (Nigeria)
Wizkid (Nigeria)
Yemi Alade (Nigeria)

Best Dancer
Robot Boii (South Africa) – WINNER
Tayc (France)
Uganda Ghetto Kids (Uganda)
Yemi Alade (Nigeria)
Zuchu (Tanzania)

Best Artist Africa: Anglophone
Asake (Nigeria) – WINNER
Ayra Starr (Nigeria) Black Sherif (Ghana)
Davido (Nigeria)
Diamond Platnumz (Tanzania)
Fireboy DML (Nigeria)

Best Artist Africa: Francophone
Didi B – Ivory Coast – WINNER
Emma’a (Gabon)
Fally Ipupa (DRC)
KO-C (Cameroon)
Locko (Cameroon)
Serge Beynaud (Ivory Coast)
Viviane Chidid (Senegal)

Best Artist Africa: Lusophone
Gerilson Insrael (Angola)
Lisandro Cuxi (Cape Verde) – WINNER
Perola (Angola)
Plutonio (Mozambique)
Soraia Ramos (Cape Verde)

Best Artist: Rwanda sponsored by Kiss FM
Ariel Wayz (Rwanda)
Bruce Melodie (Rwanda) – WINNER
Bwiza (Rwanda)
Chriss Eazy (Rwanda)
Kenny Sol (Rwanda)

Best Artist: France and Belgium
Aya Nakamura (France)
Booba (France)
Nihno (France)
Ronisia (France)
Soolking (France)
Tayc (France) – WINNER

Best Artist: UK
Central Cee – WINNER
Headie One (UK)
Ms Banks (UK)
Raye (UK)
Stormzy (UK)

Best Global Africa Artist ( By Voting): Rema WINNER

The Trace Awards included performances by approximately 50 African and Afro-inspired artists from around the world, including Davido, Yemi Alade, Mr. Eazi, and Diamond Platnumz.

The Trace Awards are a new award franchise created by Trace, a global TV and multimedia platform. The purpose of the awards is to recognize African and Afro-influenced musicians from Africa and around the African diaspora.

Content courtesy of Not Just Ok, Billboard & NFH Digital Team

The Impact of African Fashion, Food and Music on Global Pop Culture

The rich tapestry of African heritage has woven its threads deeply into the fabric of creation in the dynamic world of global pop culture, leaving an imprint that is felt by people all over the world.
The rich symphony of rhythms, colors, styles, and narratives that make up Africa’s effect on the world’s pop culture landscape has captured people’s attention.
African culture has surpassed geographical limits, influencing and enhancing the global cultural mosaic in everything from music and fashion to art and dance.

Music: A Sonic Journey
The throbbing rhythm of African music is at the core of its effect on worldwide pop culture.
Every region of the world has been influenced by pulsating rhythms, contagious melodies, and soul-stirring harmonies that have their roots in Africa.

Traditional African drumming’s rhythmic patterns have evolved into the worldwide sensation known as Afrobeat.

This genre was invented by musicians like Fela Kuti, who combined traditional rhythms with contemporary components to produce a sound that is recognized by audiences on many continents.
Today, the Afrobeat genre has captured the attention of international superstars and continues to influence contemporary music with its mix of funk, jazz, and African rhythms.

Fashion: A Kaleidoscope of Identity
A combination of color, history, and invention make up African fashion.
African textiles are more than just clothing; they are carriers of stories and symbolism, from the dexterous beadwork of Maasai jewelry to the bright designs of West African wax fabrics.

African aesthetics have been embraced by the international fashion industry, exhibiting a variety of design trends and materials.
Traditional African themes are being used as inspiration by designers to create attire that is universal. African headwraps are elegant, kente cloth is regal, and modern silhouettes are combined with indigenous textiles on the runway.

Dance: A Celebration of Life
African rhythms and movements vibrate with vitality in the world of dance. African societies place a great deal of value on traditional dances, which frequently represent rites, holidays, and storytelling.
These dances have developed into a joyful, universal language.

From hip-hop to contemporary dance, the energizing and rhythmic motions have influenced many different types of dance around the world. They demonstrate the ability of dance to span cultures and eliminate language barriers.

Art: A Canvas of Diversity
The range of African art, from prehistoric rock paintings to contemporary works of art, is as diverse as the continent itself. Abstraction, symbolism, and a connection to spirituality are features of traditional African art.
These aesthetic traditions have influenced modern artists and designers by infusing themselves into worldwide pop culture. The impact of African art can be found in graffiti, street art, and modern art galleries around the world.
The blending of classic themes with contemporary platforms speaks to the interaction between the past and present that appeals to people all around the world.

Narratives: A Window into Culture
Through oral traditions, folklore, and storytelling, African narratives have captured hearts for countless centuries. These stories frequently offer illuminating cultural and moral lessons.
African storytelling has recently discovered new outlets in literature, film, and digital media.
For instance, the revival of Afrofuturism imagines alternative worlds while drawing inspiration from African mythology and experiences.
This genre serves as evidence of how African narratives continue to have an impact on and mold the imaginary worlds of popular culture.

Stories that Bind
Imagine yourself captivated by a book that interweaves tales of bravery, resiliency, and interpersonal connections. Whether written by contemporary authors or handed down through the years, African narratives provide a view into a variety of realities.

You’re not simply reading when you immerse yourself in these tales; you’re also connecting to the knowledge of African cultures.
These stories, which are frequently based on oral traditions, serve as a reminder of the ability of storytelling to connect people across time and distance and to weave a rich tapestry of experiences.

It’s not only about adopting a trend when we incorporate African elements into our daily lives; it’s also about appreciating a rich heritage that inspires the way we think, move, and express ourselves.
Africa’s influence serves as a continual reminder that culture serves as a bridge that unites us all, whether it be through the rhythm that makes us dance, the colors that decorate our clothing, or the stories that capture our imagination.

Therefore, keep in mind that you aren’t just adopting a lifestyle when you dance to an Afrobeat song, admire African-inspired clothes, or just embrace the joy of movement. Rather, you are taking part in a worldwide celebration of creativity, harmony, and the beauty of diversity.

Parting Shots; The Unifying Thread
In conclusion, the presence of African influences in popular culture around the world is proof of the ability of culture to bring people together.
Africa’s pulsating rhythms, vivid hues, expressive dances, and intriguing stories have crossed borders and influenced pop culture all over the world.

The resonance of African culture serves as a reminder of the interconnection of humanity and the benefits of accepting diversity.

Let’s recognize the beauty that results when cultures clash, work together, and inspire one another in the worldwide tapestry of innovation as we continue to celebrate the mix of tradition and contemporary.

Content courtesy of  The Guardian Life & NFH

To Honor African Fashion and Culture, the Southern African Times Has Opened an Official Merchandise Shop.

In Honor Of African Fashion And Culture, The Southern African Times Opens Official Merch Store
The Southern African Times, a prestigious media company famous for its thorough reporting of news and events, is excited to announce the opening of its official merch store, a representation of African fashion and culture that goes beyond the bounds of conventional journalism.
The recently updated sat store is expected to enthrall audiences everywhere by reflecting the pulse of Africa and building a close relationship with its followers.

The Southern African Times’ executive director of commerce, Edgar Dzimiri, reveals that the store’s resurgence is motivated by factors other than financial success.

Instead, it aims to close the communication gap between media and viewers by creating an immersive environment that reflects the very best of African identity and innovation. “This endeavor extends beyond commerce and product development,” claims Dzimiri.
“Our main goal is to establish a deep connection with our audience.”

The Southern African Times has delved into the world of apparel and merchandise, handpicking a collection that has been meticulously selected. This is a break from the traditional path of media brand expansions.
We’re not working with organizations that are only interested in logo placement, Dzimiri emphasizes.
We are collaborating with committed designers whose carefully produced brands reflect our dedication to authenticity.

African fashion has dominated the global stage in the 21st century, from runways to music videos and movies. Notably, celebrities like Beyoncé and Michelle Obama have appeared on red carpets dressed in African garb, setting trends and igniting interest around the world.
This effect is further amplified by the prevalence of Afrobeat and African dancers on television.. While the world pays attention, young Africans everywhere are showing a rebirth of interest in their history, including a revived passion for traditional clothing and cultural practices.

An example in the field of African fashion, u.mi-1, connects with this story.
They produce contemporary jackets and pants known lovingly as “African denim” by maintaining and reworking the traditional handcrafted Nigerian cloth known as aso-oke.

The designs put a modern spin on tradition while showcasing the depth and variety of Nigerian culture in each piece.

The Southern African Times works with companies like u.mi-1 to promote African design and culture. The media behemoth adds to the ongoing discussion over the value of cultural heritage and artistic expression by opening an official retail store.
By transcending conventional storytelling and enabling readers to embody the precise essence they read about, the convergence of journalism and fashion in the Satstore offers a potent synergy.

The Southern African Times is steadfast in its dedication to engaging with its readers on a deeper level as the worldwide spotlight on African culture becomes brighter by the day.
The official merch store, which invites people to engage with the pulse of Africa and appreciate the richness of African design and culture, is a monument to this commitment.

As the world pays attention, young Africans all around the world have rekindled their interest in their history, including their love of traditional clothing and cultural practices.

Content Courtesy of MENAFN & NFH

Trace Awards & Festival 2023 Nominees Full List

The 2023 Trace Awards nominees have been revealed in advance of the ceremony, which will be held in Kigali, Rwanda, in October.

The Trace Awards & Festival, a magnificent new live awards ceremony and festival celebrating the originality, coolness, and confidence of African and Afro-inspired music and culture around the world, will mark the 20th anniversary of global music powerhouse and Afro-music tastemaker Trace.

The Trace Awards & Festival, which shines a global spotlight on artists, creators, businesspeople, and achievers from all over Africa and the African diaspora, will take place in Kigali, Rwanda, from October 20 to 21, 2023, in collaboration with Visit Rwanda and QA Venue Solutions Rwanda, the venue management company of BK Arena.

A 2-day cultural festival intended to engage and inspire music makers and listeners will take place before the 3-hour live, televised, magnificent music extravaganza.
The Trace Awards will be presented in front of 7,500 music superfans, musicians, opinion leaders, style-setters, and influencers from Africa and around the world at BK Arena in Kigali, Rwanda. Performances by the biggest African and Afro-descent artists in the world will take place there.

The Awards will honor artists in a variety of cultural and lifestyle categories while honoring a wide range of musical genres, including Afrobeat, Dancehall, Afro-pop, Mbalax, Amapiano, Zouk, Kizomba, Genge, Coupé Décalé, Bongo Flava, Soukous, Gospel, Rap, Kompa, R&B, and Rumba.

The campaign will also include a number of build-up activities, an awards tour, celebrations, and screenings across Brazil, the Indian Ocean, the Caribbean, Europe, Africa, and the United States.

The Trace Awards will be broadcast live on Trace channels in more than 180 nations to a global audience of fans of African and Afro-inspired music and culture. Additionally, Trace terrestrial TV partners and satellite stations will broadcast the awards worldwide.

Here is the complete list of 2023 Trace Award nominees.

Best Male
Burna Boy (Nigeria)
Davido (Nigeria)
Diamond Platnumz (Tanzania)
Didi B (Ivory Coast)
K.O (South Africa)
Rema (Nigeria)

Best Female
Ayra Starr (Nigeria)
Josey (Ivory Coast)
Nadia Mukami (Kenya)
Soraia Ramos (Cape Verde)
Tiwa Savage (Nigeria)
Viviane Chidid (Senegal)

Song of the Year
“BKBN” – Soraia Ramos (Cape Verde)
“People” – Libianca (Cameroon)
“Suavemente” – Soolking (France)
“Encre” Emma’a (Gabon)
“Sugarcane” – Camidoh (Ghana)
“Last Last” – Burna Boy (Nigeria)
“Rush” Ayra Starr (Nigeria)
“Calm Down” – Rema (Nigeria)
“Peru” – Fireboy DML (Nigeria) with Ed Sheeran (UK)
“Sete” – K.O (South Africa)
“Cough” – Kizz Daniel (Nigeria)
“MORTEL 06” – Innoss’B (Ivory Coast)

Best Music Video
“2 Sugar” Wizkid (Nigeria) feat. Ayra Starr (Nigeria)
“Baddie” Yemi Alade (Nigeria) “Kpaflotage” – Suspect 95 (Ivory Coast)
“Loaded” – Tiwa Savage (Nigeria) & Asake (Nigeria)
“Ronda” Blxckie (South Africa)
“Tombolo” – Kalash (Martinique)
“Yatapita” – Diamond Platnumz (Tanzania)

Best Newcomer sponsored by Belaire
Azawi (Uganda)
Krys M (Cameroon)
Libianca (Cameroon)
Nissi (Nigeria)
Odumodublvck (Nigeria)
Pabi Cooper (South Africa)
Roseline Layo (Ivory Coast)

Best Collaboration
“Many Ways” – BNXN (Nigeria) with Wizkid (Nigeria)
“Mine” – Show Dem Camp (Nigeria) with Oxlade (Nigeria)
“Peru” – Fireboy DML (Nigeria) with Ed Sheeran (UK)
“Second Sermon” – Black Sherif (Ghana) with Burna Boy (Nigeria)
“Sete” – K.O (South Africa) with Young Stunna (South Africa), Blxckie (South Africa)
“Stamina” – Tiwa Savage with Ayra Starr (Nigeria) & Young Jonn (Nigeria)
“Trumpet” – Olamide (Nigeria) with Ckay (Nigeria)
“Unavailable” – Davido (Nigeria) with Musa Keys (South Africa)

Best Artist: UK
Headie One (UK)
Ms Banks (UK)
Stormzy (UK)
Raye (UK)

Best Artist: Caribbean
Admiral T (Guadeloupe)
Bamby (French Guiana)
Kalash (Martinique)
Maureen (Martinique)
Popcaan (Jamaica)
Princess Lover (Martinique)
Rutshelle Guillaume (Haiti)
Shenseea (Jamaica)

Best Artist: Indian Ocean
Donovan BTS (Mauritius)
GaEi (Madagascar)
Goulam (Comoros)
Mikl (Reunion)
Sega el (Reunion)
Terell Elymoor (Mayotte)

Best Artist: Brazil
Djonga (Brazil)
Iza (Brazil)
Leo Santana (Brazil)
Ludmilla (Brazil)
Luedji Luna (Brazil)

Best Artist: North Africa
Amira Zouhair (Morocco)
Artmasta (Tunisia)
Dystinct (Morocco)
El Grande Toto (Morocco)
Kader Japonais (Algeria)
Raja Meziane (Algeria)
“DNK”- Aya Nakamura (France)

Best Artist: East Africa
Bruce Melodie (Rwanda)
Diamond Platnumz (Tanzania)
Zuchu (Tanzania)
Khaligraph (Kenya)
Nadia Mukani (Kenya)
Azawi (Uganda)

Album of the Year
“Love Damini” – Burna Boy (Nigeria)
“Maverick” – Kizz Daniel (Nigeria)
“More Love, Less Ego” – Wizkid (Nigeria)
“Timeless” – Davido (Nigeria)
“Work of Art” – Asake (Nigeria)

Best Collaboration
“Mine” – Show Dem Camp (Nigeria) with Oxlade (Nigeria)
“Peru” – Fireboy DML (Nigeria) with Ed Sheeran (UK)
“Second Sermon” – Black Sherif (Ghana) with Burna Boy (Nigeria)
“Sete” – K.O (South Africa) with Young Stunna (South Africa), Blxckie (South Africa)
“Stamina” – Tiwa Savage with Ayra Star(Nigeria) & Young Jonn (Nigeria)
“Trumpet” – Olamide (Nigeria) with Ckay (Nigeria)
“Unavailable” – Davido (Nigeria) with Musa Keys (South Africa)

Best DJ
Danni Gato (Cape Verde)
DJ BDK (Ivory Coast)
DJ Illans (France)
DJ Spinall (Nigeria) Michael Brun (Haiti)
Uncle Waffles (Swaziland)

Best Producer
DJ Maphorisa (South Africa)
Juls (Ghana)
Kabza de Small (South Africa)
Kel-P (Nigeria)
Tamsir (Ivory Coast)
Benjamin Dube (South Africa)

Best Gospel Artist
Benjamin Dube (South Africa)
Janet Otieno (Kenya)
KS Bloom (Ivory Coast)
Levixone (Uganda)
Moses Bliss (Nigeria)

Best Live
Burna Boy (Nigeria)
Fally Ipupa (DRC)
Musa Keys (South Africa)
The Compozers (Nigeria)
Wizkid (Nigeria)
Yemi Alade (Nigeria)

Best Dancer
Robot Boii (South Africa)
Tayc (France)
Uganda Ghetto Kids (Uganda)
Yemi Alade (Nigeria)
Zuchu (Tanzania)

Best Artist Africa: Anglophone
Asake (Nigeria)
Ayra Starr (Nigeria) Black Sherif (Ghana)
Davido (Nigeria)
Diamond Platnumz (Tanzania)
Fireboy DML (Nigeria)

Best Artist Africa: Francophone
Didi B – Ivory Coast
Emma’a (Gabon)
Fally Ipupa (DRC)
KO-C (Cameroon)
Locko (Cameroon)
Serge Beynaud (Ivory Coast)
Viviane Chidid (Senegal)

Best Artist Africa: Lusophone
Gerilson Insrael (Angola)
Lisandro Cuxi (Cape Verde)
Perola (Angola)
Plutonio (Mozambique)
Soraia Ramos (Cape Verde)

Best Artist: Rwanda
Ariel Wayz (Rwanda)
Bruce Melodie (Rwanda)
Bwiza (Rwanda)
Chriss Eazy (Rwanda)
Kenny Sol (Rwanda)

Best Artist: France & Belgium
Aya Nakamura (France)
Booba (France)
Nihno (France)
Ronisia (France)
Soolking (France)
Tayc (France)

Best Artist: UK
Central Cee (UK)
Headie One (UK)
Ms Banks (UK)
Raye (UK)
Stormzy (UK)

The Trace Awards included performances by approximately 50 African and Afro-inspired artists from around the world, including Davido, Yemi Alade, Mr. Eazi, and Diamond Platnumz.

The Trace Awards are a new award franchise created by Trace, a global TV and multimedia platform. The purpose of the awards is to recognize African and Afro-influenced musicians from Africa and around the African diaspora.

Content courtesy of Not Just Ok, Rwanda Convention Bureau & NFH Digital Team

A Recent Brooklyn Museum Exhibit Examines the Continent’s Thriving Fashion and Art Scenes During the Time of Liberation.

Co-curator Ernestine White-Mifetu gives us an illuminating tour of “Africa Fashion” and the greater narrative it encapsulates.
At the Brooklyn Museum, an electrifying new exhibition establishes Africa as a true fashion capital, bursting with imagination, ingenuity, and its own aesthetic heritage. “African Fashion” showcases the designers and other creatives leading the continent’s charge into the 21st century.

Yet the exhibition, which runs through October 22, is much more than a wondrous fantasia of eye-popping looks on mannequins. By highlighting key pieces from designers, artists, and artisans from the mid-20th century onward, it illuminates a panoply of artistic visions to come out of Africa and its diaspora, laying the fascinating historical groundwork for today’s stylistic revolution.

The Brooklyn Museum is the perfect place for curators Ernestine White-Mifetu and Annissa Malvoisin to compile over 300 objects, including not only clothing and textiles but also jewelry, art, photography, and video, as well as vintage posters, magazine covers, and other ephemera.

It has been a century since the Brooklyn Museum became the first art institution to present African art to a North American audience.
The Brooklyn Public Library and the museum have collaborated to offer loanable copies of the historical books on display in the exhibition. According to the museum, it is the biggest installation of its kind ever made in a place in North America.

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London hosted the debut of “Africa Fashion” in 2022, but it has since profited significantly from its voyage to Brooklyn.
During the tour, co-curator Ernestine White-Mifetu said, “It was important that we insert the narratives of creatives here in North America.”
As the museum’s curator of African art, she and her colleagues modified the performance for a new audience, incorporating it into its new setting and complementing it with pieces from the museum’s own collection, one of the largest in the country.
A unique fusion of African and diasporic identity with American flair is the eventual product.

The exhibition has, for instance, pieces by Aurora James and Christopher John Rogers, two designers from Brooklyn who are garnering significant attention. James was featured on the cover of Vogue in 2020 with a painted portrait by Jordan Casteel due to her African-inspired designs and her 15 Percent Pledge program, which calls on fashion shops to allocate at least 15 percent of their shelf space to Black-owned businesses.
The year after he unveiled his collection in 2018, Rogers, 24, won the top honor at the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund.

The beginning of the play coincides with the end of colonial control in Africa.
In 1956, Morocco and Tunisia declared their independence from French rule. A year later, Ghana took control of itself from Britain. 1960, known as the Year of Africa, brought the independence of 17 additional African countries.
At the conclusion of the decade, that number had increased to 48.
These singular and significant independence movements sparked profound self-reinvention and awakenings that ushered in a cultural renaissance that reverberated across the arts. It’s significant that artists take inspiration from once-disadvantaged traditions to develop entirely original and avant-garde forms.

It was a turbulent yet energetic period that, in many respects, would not have been possible without the FESTAC festival series.
The first one happened in Dakar, Senegal, in 1966, and the final one happened in Lagos, Nigeria, in 1977.
The month-long festivals, as depicted in “Africa Fashion,” welcomed performers, writers, and musicians from all over the continent and beyond.
The largest cultural festival ever held on African land, it brought together up to 15,000 participants from practically every African nation (54 at the time) and the diaspora to inspire pan-African unity via the arts. According to White-Mifetu, “You see Langston Hughes and Duke Ellington going to FESTAC in 1966, and Stevie Wonder and Alvin Ailey in 1977.

Another famous participant in 1977 was Mama Africa, a South African musician and anti-apartheid campaigner. The Black and Brown figure and its full range of creativity were widely celebrated.
The first group of clothes is found in this cheerful context. According to White-Mifetu, “As the continent freed itself, artists used fabric as a visual language to engage with the new and hopeful political landscape.”
She motioned toward a collection of commemorative garments, which were worn to mark significant political occasions.

The final one features a photograph of Nelson Mandela shortly after he was elected president of the African National Congress of South Africa in 1991 alongside a more modern print created by Nigerian designer Lola Faturoti, who is based in New York and worked to honor Barack Obama’s 2008 inauguration as president.
The next section discusses the several textile traditions prevalent on the continent, including the silk kente, raffia-woven kuba, indigo-dyed àdìrẹ, strip-woven a-kè, and mud-painted bògòlanfini, to name a few.

Both the geometric patterns painted on canvas by South African artist Esther Mahlangu and the color blocks used in Atta Kwami’s 2011 painting Another Time are inspired by the kente culture of Ghana.
“And of course,” added White-Mifetu, “we couldn’t include a contemporary Yinka Shoniba sculpture in this dialogue around the influence of textiles and their histories.”
A group of dressmakers and tailors who found themselves converted into contemporary 20th-century fashion designers developed from this crackling frisson.
Chris Seydou (Mali), Kofi Ansah (Ghana), Nama Bennis (Morocco), Alphadi (Mauritania), and Shade Thomas-Fahm (Nigeria) are five of them that are highlighted in this article.
As designers started to seek outside of their borders, a lot of the clothing on exhibit is intriguing hybridization of African and Western fashions.

The work of Thomas-Fahm, the first designer to create a store in Nigeria after visiting Britain and discovering the designer boutique, exemplifies this.
She created wrapped skirts with built-in zippers and head wraps with snaps in an effort to modernize her clients’ wardrobes.
According to White-Mifetu, “She was designed for the contemporary young woman who didn’t have time for all that draping, wrapping, and assembling.
” “Women were much more mobile and active in the post-independence world.”
A section of the display devoted to photography, which has become incredibly important to African life ever since the development of the camera, is among its more moving elements.

The portraiture of Malian photographers Seydou Keta and Malick Sidibé in the 1960s and 1970s seems to be expanded upon in two stylized fashion images by Senegalese artist Omar Victor Diop, which then lead through a corridor to the work of Brooklyn-based Kwame Braithwaite, a Guggenheim Fellow and key figure in the “Black is beautiful” movement.

There are also Hassan Hajjaj’s daring, colorfully framed images.
The “Kesh Angels” series by the Moroccan artist, which was published in 2010, featured covered and veiled ladies sitting on motionless motorbikes in front of Marrakesh’s Theatre Royal while also donning heart-shaped sunglasses and striped socks.

The exhibition’s conclusion, a last display of modern outfits created in the avant-garde attitude, most effectively drives home the idea that contemporary African fashion is a massive synthesis of various communities and influences.

The focal point is a unique burqa designed by Artsi Ifrach for Maison ArtC and fashioned of translucent crinoline in the shape of a trench coat, an idea from Europe.
It was further covered by the Moroccan designer with embroidered hands, which White-Mifetu described as “an Islamic representation of belief.”
Thebe Magugu, a well-known South African fashion designer who won the LVMH Young Fashion Designer Prize in 2019 for his investigations into African spirituality and ancestral ties, also has his Alchemy collection featured in this area.

“I hope that the exhibition challenges viewers’ perceptions of African fashion,” White-Mifetu stated. “Africa has long and richly contributed to the global conversation, whether through visual art, music, or fashion.”
“Africa Fashion” is on display at the Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11238 until October 22, 2023.

Content Courtesy of Art Net News & NFH

Diamond Platnumz – Achii ft. Koffi Olomide: True Definition Of African Fashion Sapeur To The World

Legendary Tanzanian singer, songwriter, and WCB Wasafi CEO, Diamond Platnumz lights up the music stage with a brand new breathtaking single tagged “Achii.”

In this sweet-sounding version, he tapped on the musical dexterities of  Koffi Olomide, a very talented Congolese soukous singer, dancer, producer, and composer.

Furthermore, this new release serves as a follow-up to “My Baby (Remix),” his previous delivery which featured the musical talents of Nigerian music sensation, Chike.
The production credit of this track goes to multi-skilled Tanzanian record producer, Lizer Classic.
Over and above that, this new musical composition is sure to entice you. Nonetheless, you can add to your music collection if you appreciate good music.

           Diamond Platnumz Ft. Koffi Olomide – Achii (Official Music Video)
[taq_review]

Content courtesy of NFH Digital Team