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Friday 19th of August 2022

Nairobi, Kenya

The Folklore website is elevating African fashion and helping designers get paid

“This is going to change the way people value Africa and its creators,” says Amira Rasool, founder of The Folklore, which sells clothing and accessories from prominent and emerging African brands.

Amira Rasool is the founder and CEO of The Folklore, an online concept store featuring contemporary African design. She spoke to Doreen Lorenzo for “Designing Women“, a series of interviews with brilliant women in the design industry.

Doreen Lorenzo: How did you first find your way into design?

Amira Rasool: I was a creative kid. I used to make these huge forts out of sheets all around the house. I actually used to want to be an architect. Then I failed algebra my freshman year of high school. I figured if I was going to be an architect, math would be something I needed to be somewhat good at so people weren’t walking into their homes and sliding to the right because I measured wrong.

I thought, “what’s something creative that doesn’t have to do with math or science?” I started thinking more about interior design because my dream was always to build a community of really cool houses that all look different.

I also always had on these funky outfits, so my older sister Jasmine told me: “Why don’t you just get into fashion? You watch The Devil Wears Prada all the time. You’re always getting dressed up. You like writing.” She suggested that I start a blog back in 2010 when blogging was really big. So I created a blog and an alter ego named Bobby Austin posting outfits of me wearing purple wigs and black lipstick.

 

I also started taking FIT (Fashion Institute of Technology) pre-college courses, so all my friends were just as weird as me and also had wigs on. I grew up in South Orange, New Jersey, about 40 minutes outside of New York, so I would take the train on the weekends, do my college courses, then go hang out with my friends afterward. I was one of those weird creative kids that were also a great athlete and could fit into both worlds.

Doreen Lorenzo: What made you decide to go from creative fashion blogger to entrepreneur and founder of The Folklore?

Amira Rasool: The blog is what let me know that my passion was in writing. I started doing internships as soon as I got into college floating between interning for fashion market editors, stylists, and features editors. I interned at Women’s Wear Daily and I really loved that experience. From there, I went to Marie Claire, which was really eye-opening for me because I was given a lot of responsibility.

It made me understand how hectic magazines were and learn how to take charge without anyone telling me to. I realized I was super good at organizing and providing top-quality results. My boss from Marie Claire then referred me to V Magazine where I interned in their fashion department, and later their editorial department.

During my internships, I made really good connections with the people I worked for. They saw I was a hard worker. By the time I graduated, I had multiple magazine jobs that I was up for. People in media know it’s so hard to get that entry-level job when you’re coming out of college. The fact that I had my choice between jobs was a testament to me busting my butt and always being reliable. I ultimately ended up choosing V Magazine where I worked full time for a year as their fashion coordinator before I decided to start The Folklore.

Doreen Lorenzo: What made you decide to branch out and start The Folklore?

Amira Rasool: When I was majoring in journalism at Rutgers, I started taking a bunch of African American studies courses. By the end of my junior year, I had more African American studies courses under my belt than I did journalism. I decided to change my major to African American studies. Growing up they did not do a good job teaching us about Black history outside of Martin Luther King, Harriet Tubman, and the few other Black people they let us learn about. So when I started taking those African American studies courses and started learning about so many inspiring people, I was shocked.

I became obsessed with Black literature and started reading James Baldwin, W.E.B. Du Bois, Toni Morrison, and a lot of the people who came from the Harlem Renaissance. I learned how the creatives during the time we’re able to create these great publications like Fire!! that was a part of activism, but more creative activism. I related to that because I felt like I was put on this earth to uplift my people in some powerful way. I had this fire under me to go out and make an impact within the Black community.

Fashion is very whitewashed. I’ve always been the only Black girl in every meeting and every company I go to, and they weren’t having conversations about race like they are now. I started feeling like fashion was so vain. People thought that they were curing cancer with what they were doing, but they weren’t even going beyond surface-level conversations. I liked fashion and felt I shouldn’t have to give up what I love because I want to pursue something that’s a little bit more serious and impactful. How could I do both? That’s when I started thinking about Africa.

I had taken a trip there my senior year of college and fell in love. I went to South Africa and discovered all of these cool designers, creatives, and music. I bought a bunch of clothing and accessories when I was there and started wearing them when I came back to the United States and people were stopping me and asking: “Where did you get those sandals from? Where did you get this hat from?”

I started thinking about getting access to these products again, but most of them did not have e-commerce sites and weren’t sold at retailers outside of Africa. I didn’t have access to them unless I hopped back on the plane. That’s when I came up with the idea. Why is there a whole continent full of designers that cannot penetrate the international market, and how can I help them do that? How can I use my resources, network, and overall creativity to find a way for them to have access?

I started creating a business plan and applied to the University of Cape Town for a master’s degree in African studies. Once I got in, I moved to Cape Town, South Africa, and lived there for two years learning about the designers and what they needed from an e-commerce platform. At the same time, I got to learn about various African cultures.

That informed how I thought about communicating these designers’ stories. Halfway through my program I ended coming back to the U.S. to launch The Folklore site.

Doreen Lorenzo: How did you find these African designers and fashion styles you wanted to represent through The Folklore?

Amira Rasool: There’ve always been so many different stereotypes of Africa. There’s definitely poverty in Africa, but at the end of the day, that’s not only Africa, and Africa is not the only place with widespread poverty. For a whole continent to be defined by that is ridiculous. I wanted to be able to reflect that and show this whole renaissance happening with designers incorporating their heritage into modern and contemporary forms of expression.

Being on the continent was really important because I was able to touch and feel the fabrics and most importantly, connect with the designers. I knew I wanted to stay away from Ankara prints or anything traditional because I wanted everyone to be able to wear these pieces.

I wasn’t going to be the American that came in and started selling white people Ankara prints, advocating for cultural appropriation. I also did not want to be a cultural appropriator myself, so I purposely go after pieces that can be worn comfortably by anyone.

There was already a market that catered to Black people who wanted to feel connected to the continent and their cultural heritage. I wanted to provide that counter-narrative where someone could see a piece and not know where it was created. People universally can wear these products and we know the only reason why these designs are as unique as they are is because of these designers combining their heritage, culture, and their natural environment in Africa that’s not typically portrayed.

When you don’t know that this place exists, everything’s going to look new and unique to the outside person. I’m excited to be the person to help the designers introduce this counter-narrative and share their unique stories outside of Africa.

Doreen Lorenzo: The Folklore became a 2021 Techstars accelerator company. What does this mean to you and for the future of The Folklore?

Amira Rasool: It means a lot.

The network, resources, and overall knowledge Techstars provides are extremely beneficial. I like to think that when The Folklore got into TechStars all of our brands got Techstars. Whatever knowledge or resources we absorb during the program, we are going to make sure we share with our brands.

One of Techstars’ mission statements is “Give first” and everyone who I’ve encountered at Techstars has really embraced that mission. So much of the focus is on how to help you raise money and build a profitable company. That’s a great thing because they realize what it takes to build a great company. Everyone’s been super supportive, so I’m really excited and honored to be a part of it.

Doreen Lorenzo: How do you believe Folklore will change the way people view the fashion industry in Africa?

Amira Rasool: This is going to change the way people value Africa and its creators.

The value that was placed on African designers before was the number of clicks their creativity could generate for fashion publications featuring African brand look books. They didn’t care that the press these brands were getting did not convert to dollars because a lot of the brands did not have a website to link back to. It was an afterthought.

We created a dialogue around economic opportunity and put pressure on the industry to actually put their money where their mouth is. Now they can write about these brands and link them back to The Folklore. We want to put as much value on these designers as people put on Gucci or Alexander McQueen, and honestly, there’s more value in these goods because most of them are unique and sustainably made.

People pay luxury prices because they were told these brands are important. When we’re pricing our goods, it’s really because it costs a lot of money to ship these products from Africa to the U.S. The e-commerce infrastructure has been set up, whether consciously or not, to exclude people like us.

If you’re truly committed to diversifying the designers that you work with and fighting for equity and inclusion, you have to make compromises that you would have otherwise not made for more established brands. When you’re paying for a product from our website, you’re buying something because it is amazing. People have asked to donate to my company but no, you can invest in my company, our brands, and their products. We don’t want charity.

Nobody wants charity. I want to change the way that people talk about contributing to Africa and help people recognize the value in not only how these products are produced, but in the story and the exclusivity behind them.

Written By Doreen Lorenzo

Content courtesy of Fast Company & Nairobi fashion hub 

Tshego Manche from a small town of Klerksdorp with Big Dreams For African Fashion

Tshego Manche grew up in Klerksdorp and found sartorial visibility in big city Johannesburg, Born in Klerksdorp, a small town in the North West Province of South Africa, Tshego Manche was raised in a business-oriented family.

Her parents owned a salon and cosmetic store in the township for over 20 years before venturing into other businesses.

“Coming from that environment, I already knew I wanted to be an entrepreneur,” says the 30-year-old fashionista today. “I aimed for what I am passionate about. Growing up, I always said I am a small town girl with big city dreams.”

Manche, known for her sartorial sense among friends, studied for a BCom degree in Marketing Management and whilst in varsity, worked at Pulsate, a fashion store in Africa’s richest square mile, Sandton, in Johannesburg.

“Two weeks after being employed, the owner flew down and said he had to meet me as there was a spike in sales. I was never afraid to approach people and tell them about the store, and also interact with customers. I then learned customer and marketing skills, and developed a deeper love for fashion which led me to want to start my own brand,” says Manche.

La Manche clothing was registered in early 2012 and was ready to put the all the theory into practice. Manche dropped out of varsity during her third year and went on to start selling on a small scale to friends and family, and she opened her physical store end of 2012.

Her mother contributed immensely to her startup and invested in clothing, packaging, and also paid for her flights and accommodation to look for stock in China and Turkey. The brand started growing. In 2014, she employed three workers, teamed up with stylists and magazine editors and the brand grew with sales doubling, she says.

“In 2015, we hit our million mark [offering local and international clothing]. From 2016 onwards, we hit a decline in sales as new entrants in the market came; rental for my space was also high and the location remote.

In 2017, I started 100% custom-making; growth had been slow yet steady and I had nine employees by the end of 2019. I decided to close my physical store in April 2019 and stay with one employee. Now in 2020, we are focusing solely on the online space we have rebranded and restructured.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/B89ZlRijA4o/?utm_source=ig_emebed

The coronavirus also had an impact on business but this has taught her that digitizing the business is the best way to go. She also took to social media, encouraging other entrepreneurs during the tough times.

“I invited different people from different industries to come talk to people and engage about entrepreneurship every Monday for 10 weeks. We had one livestream with over 10,000 viewers,” says Manche.

Who would have thought a small town girl would encourage entrepreneurs in a big city to keep pushing ahead in the hard times.

Content courtesy of Forbes Africa  & Nairobi fashion hub 

Symply Tacha Fashion Vlogger and Makeup artist from Nigeria 

Anita Natacha Akide (Born December 23, 1995), known professionally as “Tacha” is a reality TV star, makeup artist, vlogger and a serial entrepreneur. Born and raised in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria, Rivers State to be precise, Tacha grew up in Port Harcourt City to which earned her the tag; Port Harcourt First Daughter. In early 2016, Tacha became an Instagram sensation after several of her videos became viral on Instagram.

From 2018, she started her own beauty vlog on youtube which she delved into makeup tutorials as well as some social contents about trending topics. She went on to venture into a business as a serial entrepreneur to launch the “Everything Tacha” online fashion, beauty and electronics store.

Akide rose from being an instagram sensation to a reality star after being announced as one of the housemates in the 2019 edition of Africa’s biggest reality show, Big Brother Naija Season 4. Being the only only familiar face on the show due to her instagram presence.

Tacha remained the most talked about housemate during the period of the show and after the show, which made her “The Media It Girl.” Midway into the show, Tacha who was known for her unhinged and unapologetically bold personality, amassed a legion of ruthless loyal fans who are known as “Tacha Titans.” It became obvious during and after the show that her fans who are currently the largest fanbase in Africa, mirror her traits. Upon her exit from the show, Akide immediately signed a management deal with Billz Vizion founded by Teebillz.

In mid october 2019, the 24-year-old star became a brand ambassador to the biggest sunglasses distributor in Nigeria, House of Lunettes. House of Lunettes reportedly sold over 1500 glasses in two hours after announcing Tacha as their brand ambassador.

She went on to sign another endorsement deal with Get Fit Technology, Nigeria’s most wanted wearable fitness solutions.

In November 2019, Tacha bagged a major influencing deal with one of the world’s most renowned Alcoholic beverage, Ciroc Vodka. She represents the brand in Nigeria, Africa for their Ciroc Circle Tour across Tier 1 Cities in Nigeria.
In addition to these, Tacha signed a major endorsement deal with Royal Hair, the biggest hair brand in Nigeria. She also signed as a brand ambassador to Hype and Steam, a U.K high-street Online fashion store.

Tacha’s influencing power has made her the most sought after brand in Africa as the announcement of her deals with these brands were featured in top Newspapers, radio stations and blogs all over Africa

On December 23, 2019 Tacha celebrated her 24th Birthday with so much buzz on the internet as she became the first Big Brother Naija season 4 housemate to receive a gift of Mercedes Benz from her fans.
Towards the end of December 2019, Tacha announced her departure from Bilz Vision management which was a mutual agreement between both parties.

Tacha who is a force to reckon with has become one of Africa’s most inspiring personality of 2019 as she recently made it to Chude Jideonwo’s list of the 150 most interesting people in the culture (2019).

Tacha who is now an household name has constantly remained on everyone’s lips with a very engaging social media presence with average views of 1,300,000+ on her instagram videos on her official account, @symply_tacha. She has an average of 45% of her following as her engaging audience with the females at 55% and males at 45%. The demographics of her audience has 18 – 40 years owning a larger share of 70% all over Africa. On twitter she has a mass follower  of 500k, it is no news that the reality TV star trended worldwide and has been trending daily on Nigeria trends since September till date, and not forgetting her Youtube channel with 58k Subscribers.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CA_QVFXDpuc/?utm_source=ig_embed

She has become the only brand to trend consecutively for more than 50 days at a stretch on the platform. This is believed to have caught the attention of the co-founder and CEO of Twitter, Jack Dorsey due to analytics from the Twitter headquarters, prompting Dorsey to follow her account (Symply_Tacha) and verifying her twitter account. On Jack’s birthday, Tacha broke the Internet after sharing a FaceTime video with Jack Dorsey. The attention she has from Africans is overly impressive.

Everything Tacha by Natacha Akide is a beauty, fashion and electronics brand.
The brand was launched in 2018 with Tacha’s famous ‘PINK LIP KIT’ alongside POWER TACHA, SMILE TACHA, EYELASHES and GLOW TACHA.

Tacha was inspired to create her own brand after years of studying and understanding what works best for everyone. She saw the need to venture into business to make these products affordable and reliable for everyone.
From the best-seller PINK LIP KIT which changed the game for lip balms, Tacha’s aim is to create products that inspire young people in the world.

Tacha has since gone on to re-brand all the products to even more luxurious packages, while ensuring that her line of products caters for everyone irrespective of status and gender.

Content courtesy of Simply Tacha and Nairobi fashion hub 

Grace Alex

Grace Alex is a fashion blogger also known as T2pitchy on Instagram. She blogs at GA Fashion and is currently studying Communication Culture and Technology in Washington, D.C., USA. She initially started the blog in 2011 as a way to help her through her depression.

Her open and honest online diary helped her connect with others who could relate to what she was going through and, since then, she has worked with big brands like Google, Clinique, Daniel Wellington, New Look and ASOS, among others.

https://www.instagram.com/p/B684zEylqJs/?utm_source=ig_embed

Grace Alex is a fashion blogger also known as T2pitchy on Instagram. She blogs at GA Fashion and is currently studying Communication Culture and Technology in Washington, D.C., USA. She initially started the blog in 2011 as a way to help her through her depression. Her open and honest online diary helped her connect with others who could relate to what she was going through and, since then, she has worked with big brands like Google, Clinique, Daniel Wellington, New Look and ASOS, among others. https://www.instagram.com/p/B684zEylqJs/?utm_source=ig_embed [taq_review] She has massive followers on her Instagram 46,000 plus, and on YouTube she has less than subscribers more of her work are available on her blog Grace Alex Fashion  Content courtesy of Moss Onyi & Nairobi fashion hub Digital Team
Fashion Theme - 44%
Beauty Tips - 59%
Fitness - 66%
Street Style - 50%
Products Reviews - 25%
Original Story - 54%

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She has massive followers on her Instagram 46,000 plus, and on YouTube she has less than subscribers more of her work are available on her blog Grace Alex Fashion 

Content courtesy of Moss Onyi & Nairobi fashion hub Digital Team

Palesa Mahlaba

Palesa Mahlaba, Stylist and Fashion Consultant ,She always looks like a million bucks, and fashion is her passion. Palesa Mahlaba is the former fashion editor of True Love magazine and is now finishing off a diploma in PR, so she can take the fashion PR industry in style. Palesa chose the Symbol Jewellery and Midi-Ring trend, which she loves. “It’s a way of expressing yourself through your accessories.

I am obsessed with the midi-rings and now have an excuse to stack up on them. Plus they keep my nails looking good!” “Have fun with your jewellery, it is a fabulous way to show your personal style!”

Palesa Mahlaba, Stylist and Fashion Consultant ,She always looks like a million bucks, and fashion is her passion. Palesa Mahlaba is the former fashion editor of True Love magazine and is now finishing off a diploma in PR, so she can take the fashion PR industry in style. Palesa chose the Symbol Jewellery and Midi-Ring trend, which she loves. "It's a way of expressing yourself through your accessories. I am obsessed with the midi-rings and now have an excuse to stack up on them. Plus they keep my nails looking good!" "Have fun with your jewellery, it is a fabulous way to show your personal style!" https://www.instagram.com/p/Bo1ezkWBfHb/?utm_source=ig_embed [taq_review] She has massive followers on her Instagram 82,000 plus, and on YouTube her account  is dormant no subscribers at the moment more of her work are available on her blog Simply Palesa Edit Content courtesy of Moss Onyi & Nairobi fashion hub Digital Team
Fashion Theme - 96%
Beauty Tips - 81%
Fitness - 79%
Street Style - 69%
Products Reviews - 80%
Original Story - 70%

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She has massive followers on her Instagram 82,000 plus, and on YouTube her account  is dormant no subscribers at the moment more of her work are available on her blog Simply Palesa Edit

Content courtesy of Moss Onyi & Nairobi fashion hub Digital Team

Tshepang Mollison

The fashion and beauty influencer is definitely body goals and when she’s not travelling to exotic places then she’s chilling and eating the finest food because “Twiggy takes snaps and eats a lot”.

Tshepang ” Twiggy ” Mollison she is a Film & Radio production graduate from UCT and Brand Strategy & communications graduate from Vega a with a keen interest in food, photography and travel.

Besides that, she is also a fashionista of note who knows how to play around with her wardrobe. Furthermore, as a model, she has collaborated with big brands such as Spree, Tommy Hilfiger and Fila just to name a few, Judging from her Instagram page, Twiggy is also a fan of warmer weather and enjoys playing in the water.

 

The fashion and beauty influencer is definitely body goals and when she’s not travelling to exotic places then she’s chilling and eating the finest food because “Twiggy takes snaps and eats a lot”. Tshepang " Twiggy " Mollison she is a Film & Radio production graduate from UCT and Brand Strategy & communications graduate from Vega a with a keen interest in food, photography and travel. Besides that, she is also a fashionista of note who knows how to play around with her wardrobe. Furthermore, as a model, she has collaborated with big brands such as Spree, Tommy Hilfiger and Fila just to name a few, Judging from her Instagram page, Twiggy is also a fan of warmer weather and enjoys playing in the water.   https://www.instagram.com/p/B9mQHgxANJQ/?utm_source=ig_embed [taq_review] She has massive followers on her Instagram 40,000 plus, and on YouTube she has less than 1,000 subscribers more of her work are available on her blog Sleepless in Soweto Content courtesy of Moss Onyi & Nairobi fashion hub Digital Team
Fashion Theme - 75%
Beauty Tips - 84%
Fitness - 98%
Street Style - 38%
Products Reviews - 78%
Original Story - 65%

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She has massive followers on her Instagram 40,000 plus, and on YouTube she has less than 1,000 subscribers more of her work are available on her blog Sleepless in Soweto

Content courtesy of Moss Onyi & Nairobi fashion hub Digital Team

Moss Onyi

Moss Onyi is a fashion, travel and lifestyle blogger who moved to the UK in order to advance her career as a chartered account. However, she is now a full time blogger and is based in Manchester, UK. She also works as a photographer and, since late 2017, runs the Moss Onyi blog with her husband, Craig Moss.

The blog, as well as her unique taste in fashion, will leave you dreaming of a place far, far away, where you can get lost in a world that only dreams are made of.

Moss Onyi is a fashion, travel and lifestyle blogger who moved to the UK in order to advance her career as a chartered account. However, she is now a full time blogger and is based in Manchester, UK. She also works as a photographer and, since late 2017, runs the Moss Onyi blog with her husband, Craig Moss. The blog, as well as her unique taste in fashion, will leave you dreaming of a place far, far away, where you can get lost in a world that only dreams are made of. https://www.instagram.com/p/B9XOxdLlaF_/?utm_source=ig_embed [taq_review] She has massive followers on her Instagram 92,000 plus, and on YouTube she has 7,000 plus subscribers more of her work are available on her blog Moss Onyi  Content courtesy of Moss Onyi & Nairobi fashion hub Digital Team
Fashion Theme - 80%
Beauty Tips - 30%
Fitness - 68%
Street Style - 98%
Products Reviews - 41%
Original Story - 81%

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She has massive followers on her Instagram 92,000 plus, and on YouTube she has 7,000 plus subscribers more of her work are available on her blog Moss Onyi 

Content courtesy of Moss Onyi & Nairobi fashion hub Digital Team

Chic Ama Nigerian Born Style Blogger Based in Washington DC

Chic Ama, a Nigerian fashion blogger who resides in Washington DC, USA has not ceased to recreate fashion trends with her style. The fashion blogger enjoys experimenting with different types of fashion.
She creates style inspiration for street fashion with her daily post on Instagram and her website. Chic Ama is a force to reckon with in the world of fashion.

A glance through her stunning pictures will literally leave thousands of fashionistas dreaming of living her amazing life,Her brand name, Ama, has grown to become a well-grounded force to reckon with in the international fashion and style community, Chic Ama’s style is the purest possible definition of a classic chic. Her style is simply flawless.

Chichi Ama street fashion blogger  with high sense of creativity 

 

Chic Ama is fashion blogger and  owner of “chicamastyle.com”, proud mother, and wife to a loving husband. Chichi who is based in Washington, USA, started blogging as a result of her social media followers, friends and family who saw how neatly and creatively she was able to combine styles, and recreate trends.

She’s of the opinion that being “you don’t have to break the bank to look expensive and gorgeous”. She also has her private business as a personal stylist.

Chichi of the blog Chic Ama Style, is a stylish African woman currently residing in Washington DC. Chic Ama describes fashion as defining who you are as an individual based on the colors you put together, combined with good accessories to give that finished unique appearance.

Her sense of style is what I would describe as high fashion, DIY gorgeous, classy and elegant. She loves figure hugging styles, high heels, statement sunglasses and statement  bags. Her posts are usually on an outfit of the day basis, which clearly indicates that she slays all day.

Chicama is not only a fashion blogger but also a brand influencer, personal stylist and personal shopper

Content courtesy of Chic Ama Style & Nairobi fashion hub

Lisa Gaitho

Lisa Gaitho is the daughter of Macharia Gaitho. Macharia is a former editor at Nation Media Group. Most Kenyans love Macharia for his non-political stand and how he remains unbiased even in hot political situations.

Lisa, on the other hand, is a blogger, Vlogger, and social media personality who majors in fashion and lifestyle issues.

Lisa Gaitho has 7,000 plus subscribers on YouTube and more than 25,000 followers on her Instagram page  She loves traveling and exploring nature. She is also a professional chef and natural hair and fitness enthusiast. In her blog, she experiments with grey, white and black outfits. Gaitho plays around with sassy trends cutting across as elegant.

Together with her sister, they founded Siri studio which is famous for their trendy female outfits. Lisa studied in Kenyan schools before going to South Africa for her university studies.

Lisa runs a blog, lisagaitho.com. Here she writes about her experiences traveling the world. She also doesn’t fail to praise her older but incredibly rich boyfriend who funds her trips, much to the chagrin of women. Her blogs usually attract a backlash from her readers, most accusing her of looking down upon her Kenyan fellows and relying on a man to make her dreams happen. But, Lisa intoxicated with love and floating in its whirlwind will hear none of it. Who will anyways, especially if the boyfriend has deep pockets and is willing to spend it on someone?

Content courtesy of Lisa Gaitho, Anita Gaitho & Nairobi fashion hub Online Digital Team

Sharon Mundia

Sharon Mundia started blogging right after graduating from Monash University in South Africa with a degree in Marketing and Management. She had always had a passion for literature, even receiving a high school literary award, but practicality won out when it came to choosing an academic major.
Mundia came to realize that fashion isn’t just about being trendy and cute, it’s about expressing your character, building your confidence and ultimately celebrating yourself.

Sharon has 56,000 plus subscribers on YouTube channel and more than 14,000 plus followers on Instagram page, her blog is much active with a good number of direct traffic.

I’m lucky enough to be able to do what I love which, in essence, is to share my personal style and other bits of my life in the hope that it will inspire women of all ages.

Sharon Mundia started blogging right after graduating from Monash University in South Africa with a degree in Marketing and Management. She had always had a passion for literature, even receiving a high school literary award, but practicality won out when it came to choosing an academic major. Mundia came to realize that fashion isn’t just about being trendy and cute, it’s about expressing your character, building your confidence and ultimately celebrating yourself. Sharon has 56,000 plus subscribers on YouTube channel and more than 14,000 plus followers on Instagram page, her blog is much active with a good number of direct traffic. I’m lucky enough to be able to do what I love which, in essence, is to share my personal style and other bits of my life in the hope that it will inspire women of all ages. [taq_review] Luckily for her, the background in marketing came in handy when she started to think of her blog, This is Ess, – which started as an online avenue for sharing little pieces of her life – as a platform on which to build her brand. Content courtesy of This is Ess, She lead & Nairobi fashion hub 
Fashion Theme - 39%
Beauty Tips - 55%
Fitness - 21%
Street Style - 52%
Products Reviews - 39%
Original Story - 94%

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User Rating: 4.35 ( 1 votes)
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Luckily for her, the background in marketing came in handy when she started to think of her blog, This is Ess, – which started as an online avenue for sharing little pieces of her life – as a platform on which to build her brand.

Content courtesy of This is Ess, She lead & Nairobi fashion hub 

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